Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 15 items for :

  • Paediatric endocrinology x
  • Refine by Access: All content x
Clear All
Open access

Darija Tudor, Iva Kolombo, Ana Tot, Drasko Cikojevic, Marko Simunovic, and Veselin Skrabic

Summary

This is a case report of a child with chronic hyponatremia due to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) as a paraneoplastic manifestation of olfactory neuroblastoma (OFN). We hereby report a clinical presentation as well as a pragmatic approach to one of the most common electrolytic disorders in the pediatric population and have emphasized the necessity of involving the sinonasal area in the diagnostic procedure while evaluating possible causes of SIADH. This report indicates that the chronicity of the process along with the gradual onset of hyponatremia occurrence is responsible for the lack of neurological symptoms at the moment of disease presentation.

Learning points

  • Hyponatremia is not infrequently attributed to SIADH.

  • Paraneoplastic syndromes are uncommon but they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pediatric SIADH.

  • Chronic insidious hyponatremia may not be associated with clear neurological symptoms despite its severity.

Open access

Priya Darshani Chhiba and David Segal

Summary

Recombinant human growth hormone therapy (rhGH) has been available since 1985 for a variety of conditions and has expanded the indications for rhGH therapy and the number of patients receiving therapy. The very nature of the therapy exposes individuals to years of injections. There are a number of well-known adverse events, however, a lesser-known and rarely reported adverse event of rhGH therapy is localized lipoatrophy. We report nine cases of localized lipoatrophy during rhGH therapy accounting for 14.5% of patients taking rhGH presenting to a single centre for routine follow-up over just a 2-month period. The development of localized lipoatrophy does not appear to be age, indication or dose-related but rather related to repeated administration of rhGH into a limited number of sites. The most likely putative mechanism is the local lipolytic action of growth hormone (GH) itself, although the possibility of an excipient-based interaction cannot be excluded. Given the high prevalence of this adverse event and the potential to prevent it with adequate site rotation, we can recommend that patients be informed of the possible development of localized lipoatrophy. Doctors and nurses should closely examine injection sites at each visit, and site rotation should be emphasized during injection technique education.

Learning points

  • There are a number of well-known adverse events, however, a lesser-known and rarely reported adverse event of rhGH therapy is localized lipoatrophy.

  • Examination of the injection sites at each visit by the treating healthcare practitioner.

  • To advise the parents/caregivers/patients to change their injection site with each injection.

  • To advise the parents/caregivers/patients to change the needles after every use.

  • For parents, caregivers and patients to self-inspect their injection sites and have a high alert for the development of lipoatrophy and to then immediately report it to their doctor.

Open access

Ashwini Maudhoo, Avinaash Maharaj, Federica Buonocore, Gabriel Angel Martos-Moreno, Jesús Argente, John C Achermann, Li F Chan, and Lou A Metherell

Summary

Congenital isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD) is a rare condition characterised by low plasma ACTH and serum cortisol with normal production of other pituitary hormones. TBX19 (also known as TPIT) is a T-box pituitary restricted transcription factor important for POMC gene transcription and terminal differentiation of POMC-expressing cells. TBX19 gene mutations have been shown to cause neonatal-onset congenital IAD. We report a neonate of Romanian origin, who presented at 15 h of life with respiratory arrest and hypoglycaemia which recurred over the following 2 weeks. Biochemical investigations revealed IAD, with undetectable serum cortisol (cortisol < 1 μg/dL; normal range (NR): 7.8–26.2) and plasma ACTH levels within the normal range (22.1 pg/mL; NR: 4.7–48.8). He responded to hydrocortisone treatment. Patient DNA was analysed by a HaloPlex next-generation sequencing array targeting genes for adrenal insufficiency. A novel homozygous synonymous mutation p.Thr96= (Chr1:168260482; c.288G>A; rs376493164; allele frequency 1 × 10−5, no homozygous) was found in exon 2 of the TBX19 gene. The effect of this was assessed by an in vitro splicing assay, which revealed aberrant splicing of exon 2 giving rise to a mutant mRNA transcript whereas the WT vector spliced exon 2 normally. This was identified as the likely cause of IAD in the patient. The predicted protein product would be non-functional in keeping with the complete loss of cortisol production and early presentation in the patient.

Learning points

  • Synonymous variants (a nucleotide change that does not alter protein sequence) usually thought to be benign may still have detrimental effects on RNA and protein function causing disease. Hence, they should not be ignored, especially if very rare in public databases.

  • In vitro splicing assays can be employed to characterise the consequence of intronic and exonic nucleotide gene changes that may alter splicing.

  • Establishing a diagnosis due to a TBX19 mutation is important as it defines a condition of isolated ACTH deficiency not associated with additional pituitary deficiencies.

Open access

Katsuo Tao, Midori Awazu, Misa Honda, Hironori Shibata, Takayasu Mori, Shinichi Uchida, Tomonobu Hasegawa, and Tomohiro Ishii

Summary

We report a male infant with congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) who presented with hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia since birth. Serum sodium started to increase at 39 days. Although there was no polyuria, urine osmolality was 71 mOsm/kg, when serum osmolality was 296 mOsm/kg with plasma arginine vasopressin 22.5 pg/mL. He was thus diagnosed as NDI. An undetectable level of urine calcium and unsuppressed intact parathyroid hormone suggested hyperparathyroidism including calcium-sensing receptor mutations that could cause hypercalcemia-induced NDI. Polyuria became apparent after the initiation of i.v. infusion for the treatment of hypernatremia. Low calcium and low sodium formula with hypotonic fluid infusion did not correct hypernatremia, hypercalcemia, or hyperphosphatemia. Hydrochlorothiazide and subsequently added celecoxib effectively decreased urine output and corrected electrolytes abnormalities. Normal serum electrolytes were maintained after the discontinuation of low calcium formula. The genetic analysis revealed a large deletion of the arginine vasopressin receptor-2 (AVPR2) gene but no pathogenic variant in the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) gene. Whether hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia were caused by dehydration alone or in combination with other mechanisms remains to be clarified.

Learning points

  • Congenital NDI can present with neonatal hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia.

  • Hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia can be treated with low calcium and low sodium formula, hydration, hydrochlorothiazide, and celecoxib.

  • Genetic testing is sometimes necessary in the differentiating diagnosis of hypercalcemia associated with NDI.

Open access

Shunsuke Shimazaki, Itsuro Kazukawa, Kyoko Mori, Makiko Kihara, and Masanori Minagawa

Summary

Ammonium acid urate (AAU) crystals are rare in industrialized countries. Furthermore, the number of children with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) who develop severe acute kidney injury (AKI) after hospitalization is small. We encountered two patients with AKI caused by AAU crystals during the recovery phase of DKA upon admission. They were diagnosed with severe DKA and hyperuricemia. Their urine volume decreased and AKI developed several days after hospitalization; however, acidosis improved in both patients. Urine sediment analysis revealed AAU crystals. They were treated with urine alkalization and diuretics. Excretion of ammonia in the urine and urine pH levels increased after treatment of DKA, which resulted in the formation of AAU crystals. In patients with severe DKA, the urine and urine sediment should be carefully examined as AAU can form in the recovery phase of DKA.

Learning points:

  • Ammonium acid urate crystals could be formed in the recovery phase of diabetic ketoacidosis.

  • Diabetic ketoacidosis patients may develop acute kidney injury caused by ammonium acid urate crystals.

  • Urine and urine sediment should be carefully checked in patients with severe DKA who present with hyperuricemia and volume depletion.

Open access

Nami Mohammadian Khonsari, Benyamin Hakak-Zargar, Tessa Voth, and Shahab Noorian

Summary

Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is a lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) that results in the accumulation of sulfate esters which go on to cause neurological deterioration and mental delay, skin changes, and dysmorphism. The disease can be categorized into three subtypes based on the age of onset: neonatal, late infantile, or juvenile. Our patient is a 2.5-year-old girl, the only child of a healthy couple. Prior to the presentation of the disease, she had not been noted to have any previous health complications. The condition began at the age of 6 months with developmental regression and global hypotonia. Following thorough evaluation and testing, the patient was diagnosed with severe late infantile MSD, although some features, such as minimal mental deterioration, minimal dysmorphic facial features, and minimal organ enlargement, did not fully correlate with the diagnosis, since in cases of severe forms of the condition these features are almost always quite marked. The unexpected minimalism of some of the patient’s MSD signs in spite of the severity of her MSD condition made her case worth further studying.

Learning points:

  • Treating dermatologic signs and symptoms greatly eased our patient’s discomfort.

  • We would suggest the use of appropriate supportive treatment for symptom management regardless of the life expectancy of the patient.

  • As regards the diagnosis of MLD, given that in some cases the patient may present with irregular features of the condition, a genetic evaluation may be useful for accurate diagnosis.

  • If motor function impairment is followed by dermatologic involvement, as seen in our patient and in many cases in the literature, MSD must be considered, and additional tests should be done to rule it out.

Open access

A Chinoy, N B Wright, M Bone, and R Padidela

Summary

Hypokalaemia at presentation of diabetic ketoacidosis is uncommon as insulin deficiency and metabolic acidosis shifts potassium extracellularly. However, hypokalaemia is a recognised complication of the management of diabetic ketoacidosis as insulin administration and correction of metabolic acidosis shifts potassium intracellularly. We describe the case of a 9-year-old girl with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus presenting in diabetic ketoacidosis, with severe hypokalaemia at presentation due to severe and prolonged emesis. After commencing management for her diabetic ketoacidosis, her serum sodium and osmolality increased rapidly. However, despite maximal potassium concentrations running through peripheral access, and multiple intravenous potassium ‘corrections’, her hypokalaemia persisted. Seventy two hours after presentation, she became drowsy and confused, with imaging demonstrating central pontine myelinolysis – a rare entity seldom seen in diabetic ketoacidosis management in children despite rapid shifts in serum sodium and osmolality. We review the literature associating central pontine myelinolysis with hypokalaemia and hypothesise as to how the hypokalaemia may have contributed to the development of central pontine myelinolysis. We also recommend an approach to the management of a child in diabetic ketoacidosis with hypokalaemia at presentation.

Learning points:

  • Hypokalaemia is a recognised complication of treatment of paediatric diabetic ketoacidosis that should be aggressively managed to prevent acute complications.

  • Central pontine myelinolysis is rare in children, and usually observed in the presence of rapid correction of hyponatraemia. However, there is observational evidence of an association between hypokalaemia and central pontine myelinolysis, potentially by priming the endothelial cell membrane to injury by lesser fluctuations in osmotic pressure.

  • Consider central pontine myelinolysis as a complication of the management of paediatric diabetic ketoacidosis in the presence of relevant symptoms with profound hypokalaemia and/or fluctuations in serum sodium levels.

  • We have suggested an approach to the management strategies of hypokalaemia in paediatric diabetic ketoacidosis which includes oral potassium supplements if tolerated, minimising the duration and the rate of insulin infusion and increasing the concentration of potassium intravenously (via central line if necessary).

Open access

Yang Timothy Du, Lynette Moore, Nicola K Poplawski, and Sunita M C De Sousa

Summary

A 26-year-old man presented with a combination of permanent neonatal diabetes due to pancreatic aplasia, complex congenital heart disease, central hypogonadism and growth hormone deficiency, structural renal abnormalities with proteinuria, umbilical hernia, neurocognitive impairment and dysmorphic features. His older brother had diabetes mellitus due to pancreatic hypoplasia, complex congenital heart disease, hypospadias and umbilical hernia. Their father had an atrial septal defect, umbilical hernia and diabetes mellitus diagnosed incidentally in adulthood on employment screening. The proband’s paternal grandmother had a congenital heart defect. Genetic testing of the proband revealed a novel heterozygous missense variant (Chr18:g.19761441T>C, c.1330T>C, p.Cys444Arg) in exon 4 of GATA6, which is class 5 (pathogenic) using American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics guidelines and is likely to account for his multisystem disorder. The same variant was detected in his brother and father, but not his paternal grandmother. This novel variant of GATA6 likely occurred de novo in the father with autosomal dominant inheritance in the proband and his brother. The case is exceptional as very few families with monogenic diabetes due to GATA6 mutations have been reported to date and we describe a new link between GATA6 and renal pathology.

Learning points:

  • Monogenic diabetes should be suspected in patients presenting with syndromic features, multisystem congenital disease, neonatal-onset diabetes and/or a suggestive family history.

  • Recognition and identification of genetic diabetes may improve patient understanding and empowerment and allow for better tailored management.

  • Identification of a genetic disorder may have important implications for family planning.

Open access

Suguru Watanabe, Jun Kido, Mika Ogata, Kimitoshi Nakamura, and Tomoyuki Mizukami

Summary

Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) are the most severe acute complications of diabetes mellitus (DM). HHS is characterized by severe hyperglycemia and hyperosmolality without significant ketosis and acidosis. A 14-year-old Japanese boy presented at the emergency room with lethargy, polyuria and polydipsia. He belonged to a baseball club team and habitually drank sugar-rich beverages daily. Three weeks earlier, he suffered from lassitude and developed polyuria and polydipsia 1 week later. He had been drinking more sugar-rich isotonic sports drinks (approximately 1000–1500 mL/day) than usual (approximately 500 mL/day). He presented with HHS (hyperglycemia (1010 mg/dL, HbA1c 12.3%) and mild hyperosmolality (313 mOsm/kg)) without acidosis (pH 7.360), severe ketosis (589 μmol/L) and ketonuria. He presented HHS in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) with elevated glutamate decarboxylase antibody and islet antigen 2 antibody. Consuming beverages with high sugar concentrations caused hyperglycemia and further exacerbates thirst, resulting in further beverage consumption. Although he recovered from HHS following intensive transfusion and insulin treatment, he was significantly sensitive to insulin therapy. Even the appropriate amount of insulin may result in dramatically decreasing blood sugar levels in patients with T1DM. We should therefore suspect T1DM in patients with HHS but not those with obesity. Moreover, age, clinical history and body type are helpful for identifying T1DM and HHS. Specifically, drinking an excess of beverages rich in sugars represents a risk of HHS in juvenile/adolescent T1DM patients.

Learning points:

  • Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) is characterized by severe hyperglycemia and hyperosmolality without significant ketosis and acidosis.

  • The discrimination between HHS of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in initial presentation is difficult.

  • Pediatrician should suspect T1DM in patients with HHS but not obesity.

  • Age, clinical history and body type are helpful for identifying T1DM and HHS.

  • Children with T1DM are very sensitive to insulin treatment, and even appropriate amount of insulin may result in dramatically decreasing blood sugar levels.

Open access

Saurabh Uppal, James Blackburn, Mohammed Didi, Rajeev Shukla, James Hayden, and Senthil Senniappan

Summary

Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) can be associated with embryonal tumours and congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI). We present an infant with BWS who developed congenital hepatoblastoma and Wilms’ tumour during infancy. The infant presented with recurrent hypoglycaemia requiring high intravenous glucose infusion and was biochemically confirmed to have CHI. He was resistant to diazoxide but responded well to octreotide and was switched to Lanreotide at 1 year of age. Genetic analysis for mutations of ABCC8 and KCNJ11 were negative. He had clinical features suggestive of BWS. Methylation-sensitive multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification revealed hypomethylation at KCNQ1OT1:TSS-DMR and hypermethylation at H19 /IGF2:IG-DMR consistent with mosaic UPD(11p15). Hepatoblastoma was detected on day 4 of life, which was resistant to chemotherapy, requiring surgical resection. He developed Wilms’ tumour at 3 months of age, which also showed poor response to induction chemotherapy with vincristine and actinomycin D. Surgical resection of Wilms’ tumour was followed by post-operative chemotherapy intensified with cycles containing cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, carboplatin and etoposide, in addition to receiving flank radiotherapy. We report, for the first time, an uncommon association of hepatoblastoma and Wilms’ tumour in BWS in early infancy. Early onset tumours may show resistance to chemotherapy. UPD(11p15) is likely associated with persistent CHI in BWS.

Learning points:

  • Long-acting somatostatin analogues are effective in managing persistent CHI in BWS.

  • UPD(11)pat genotype may be a pointer to persistent and severe CHI.

  • Hepatoblastoma and Wilms’ tumour may have an onset within early infancy and early tumour surveillance is essential.

  • Tumours associated with earlier onset may be resistant to recognised first-line chemotherapy.