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Open access

Ohoud Al Mohareb, Mussa H Al Malki, O Thomas Mueller and Imad Brema

Summary

Resistance to thyroid hormone-beta (RTHbeta) is a rare inherited syndrome characterized by variable reduced tissue responsiveness to the intracellular action of triiodothyronine (T3), the active form of the thyroid hormone. The presentation of RTHbeta is quite variable and mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor beta (THR-B) gene have been detected in up to 90% of patients. The proband was a 34-year-old Jordanian male who presented with intermittent palpitations. His thyroid function tests (TFTs) showed a discordant profile with high free T4 (FT4) at 45.7 pmol/L (normal: 12–22), high free T3 (FT3) at 11.8 pmol/L (normal: 3.1–6.8) and inappropriately normal TSH at 3.19 mIU/L (normal: 0.27–4.2). Work up has confirmed normal alpha subunit of TSH of 0.1 ng/mL (normal <0.5) and pituitary MRI showed no evidence of a pituitary adenoma; however, there was an interesting coincidental finding of partially empty sella. RTHbeta was suspected and genetic testing confirmed a known mutation in the THR-B gene, where a heterozygous A to G base change substitutes valine for methionine at codon 310. Screening the immediate family revealed that the eldest son (5 years old) also has discordant thyroid function profile consistent with RTHbeta and genetic testing confirmed the same M310V mutation that his father harbored. Moreover, the 5-year-old son had hyperactivity, impulsivity and aggressive behavior consistent with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This case demonstrates an unusual co-existence of RTHbeta and partially empty sella in the same patient which, to our knowledge, has not been reported before.

Learning points:

  • We report the coincidental occurrence of RTHbeta and a partially empty sella in the same patient that has not been previously reported.
  • TFTs should be done in all children who present with symptoms suggestive of ADHD as RTHbeta is a common finding in these children.
  • The management of children with ADHD and RTHbeta could be challenging for both pediatricians and parents and the administration of T3 with close monitoring may be helpful in some cases.
  • Incidental pituitary abnormalities do exist in patients with RTHbeta, although extremely rare, and should be evaluated thoroughly and separately.
Open access

Wael M Almistehi and Mussa H Almalki

Summary

Giant prolactinomas are a rare entity; during pregnancy, the risk for complications associated with these tumors is higher. Here, we report a case of a young woman who had an invasive, giant prolactinoma post resection with residual disease who became pregnant. This patient was treated with cabergoline to prevent tumor expansion in pregnancy, resulting in the uneventful delivery of a healthy baby boy.

Learning points:

  • Giant prolactinoma can cause both diagnostic and therapeutic challenges given their atypical presentation.
  • Accurate diagnosis is paramount to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention or pituitary irradiation.
  • This case demonstrates the effectiveness and safety of CAB therapy during pregnancy.
Open access

Noman Ahmad, Abdulmonem Mohammed Almutawa, Mohamed Ziyad Abubacker, Hossam Ahmed Elzeftawy and Osama Abdullah Bawazir

Summary

An insulinoma is a rare tumour with an incidence of four cases per million per year in adults. The incidence in children is not established. There is limited literature available in children with insulinoma, and only one case is reported in association with Down’s syndrome in adults. Insulinoma diagnosis is frequently missed in adults as well as in children. The Whipple triad is the most striking feature although it has limited application in young children. Hypoglycaemia with elevated insulin, C-peptide and absent ketones is highly suggestive of hyperinsulinism. We present a case of 10-year-old boy with Down’s syndrome with recurrent insulinoma. He was initially misdiagnosed as having an adrenal insufficiency and developed cushingoid features and obesity secondary to hydrocortisone treatment and excessive sugar intake. The tumour was successfully localised in the head of the pancreas with an MRI and octreotide scan on first presentation. Medical treatment with diazoxide and octreotide could not achieve normal blood glucose levels. The insulinoma was laparoscopically enucleated and pathological examination confirmed a neuroendocrine tumour. Subsequently, he had complete resolution of symptoms. He had a recurrence after 2 years with frequent episodes of hypoglycaemia. The biochemical workup was suggestive of hyperinsulinism. MRI and PET scan confirmed the recurrence at the same site (head of the pancreas). He had an open laparotomy for insulinoma resection. The pathology was consistent with benign insulinoma, and subsequently, he had complete resolution of symptoms.

Learning points:

  • Insulinoma is a very rare tumour in children; it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hypoglycaemia with absent ketones.
  • Refractory neurological symptoms like seizure, migraine, mood changes and regression of learning abilities should suggest evaluation for hypoglycaemia.
  • MRI with contrast and PET scan would localise the majority of pancreatic beta islet cell lesions.
  • Medical treatment with diazoxide, octreotide and the addition of corn starch in feeds is not curative but can be supportive to maintain normoglycemia until the surgical resection.
  • Surgical resection is the only curative treatment. The surgical procedure of choice (laparoscopic/open laparotomy) depends on local expertise, preoperative localisation, tumour size and number.
  • Surgical treatment results in complete resolution of symptoms, but all cases should be closely followed up to monitor for recurrence. The recurrence rate is four times higher in MEN1 cases.