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Open access

Syed Ali Imran, Khaled A Aldahmani, Lynette Penney, Sidney E Croul, David B Clarke, David M Collier, Donato Iacovazzo and Márta Korbonits

Summary

Early-onset acromegaly causing gigantism is often associated with aryl-hydrocarbon-interacting receptor protein (AIP) mutation, especially if there is a positive family history. A15y male presented with tiredness and visual problems. He was 201 cm tall with a span of 217 cm. He had typical facial features of acromegaly, elevated IGF-1, secondary hypogonadism and a large macroadenoma. His paternal aunt had a history of acromegaly presenting at the age of 35 years. Following transsphenoidal surgery, his IGF-1 normalized and clinical symptoms improved. He was found to have a novel AIP mutation destroying the stop codon c.991T>C; p.*331R. Unexpectedly, his father and paternal aunt were negative for this mutation while his mother and older sister were unaffected carriers, suggesting that his aunt represents a phenocopy.

Learning points:

  • Typical presentation for a patient with AIP mutation with excess growth and eunuchoid proportions.
  • Unusual, previously not described AIP variant with loss of the stop codon.
  • Phenocopy may occur in families with a disease-causing germline mutation.
Open access

Bronwen E Warner, Carol D Inward and Christine P Burren

Summary

This case, presenting with bilateral impalpable testes, illustrates the relevance of a broad differential disorders of sex development case management. It provides new insights on hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal (HPG) axis and testicular function abnormalities in the multisystem disorder of Lowe syndrome. Lowe syndrome, also known as oculocerebrorenal syndrome, is a rare disorder characterised by eye abnormalities, central nervous system involvement and proximal renal tubular acidosis. There are a handful of reports of pubertal delay, infertility and cryptorchidism in Lowe syndrome. Biochemistry aged 72 h: testosterone 6.4 nmol/L, LH <0.5 IU/L and FSH <0.5 IU/L. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test identified significantly raised baseline LH = 45.4 IU/L (contrasts with earlier undetectable LH), with a 20% increase on stimulation, while baseline FSH = 4.3 IU/L with no increase on stimulation. Day 14 HCG stimulation test produced an acceptable 50% increase in testosterone. The constellation of further abnormalities suggested Lowe syndrome: hypotonia, bilateral cataracts (surgical extraction and intraocular lens implantation) and renal tubular acidosis (microscopic haematuria, hypercalciuria, proteinuria, generalised aminoaciduria, hypophosphataemia and metabolic acidosis). DNA sequencing identified de novo hemizygous frameshift mutation OCRL c.2409_2410delCT in exon 22. Interpretation of initial and repeat GnRH and HCG testing indicates the likelihood of testicular failure. Partial testicular descent occurred but left orchidopexy was required. Improving long-term gonadal function in Lowe syndrome assumes increased importance for current cohorts as advances in renal replacement therapy have greatly improved life expectancy. Noting HPG axis abnormalities in Lowe syndrome in infancy can identify cases requiring increased surveillance of pubertal progress for earlier detection and management.

Learning points:

  • Clinical endocrine problems in Lowe syndrome has been reported, but has focused on abnormalities in adolescence and young adulthood: pubertal delay and infertility.
  • We present an infant with isolated LH elevation at baseline and on GnRH stimulation testing who also had bilateral impalpable testes.
  • Early testing of the HPG axis in patients with Lowe syndrome may help predict gonadal abnormalities from a younger age, which will enhance the overall case management into adolescence.
Open access

Hanna Remde, Elke Kaminsky, Mathias Werner and Marcus Quinkler

Summary

We report of a male patient aged 32 years who presented with primary hyperparathyroidism. Three parathyroid glands were resected. At the age of 46 years, nervus facialis irritation was noted, and an MRI scan incidentally revealed a non-functioning pituitary adenoma with affection of the chiasma opticum. The patient underwent transsphenoidal operation resulting in pituitary insufficiency postoperatively. At the same time, primary hyperparathyroidism reoccurred and a parathyroid adenoma located at the thymus was resected. The mother of the patient died early due to multiple tumors. The patient was suspected to have multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and genetic analysis was performed. In addition, on clinical examination, multiple exostoses were noticed and an additional genetic analysis was performed. His father was reported to have multiple osteochondromas too. MEN1 was diagnosed in the patient showing a novel heterozygote mutation c.2T>A in exon 2, codon 1 (start codon ATG>AAG;p.Met1?) of the MEN1 gene. In genetic mutational analysis of the EXT1 gene, another not yet known mutation c.1418-2A>C was found in intron 5 of the EXT1 gene (heterozygotic). In conclusion, we report novel mutations of the EXT1 and the MEN1 genes causing hereditary multiple osteochondromas and MEN1 in one patient.

Learning points

  • It is important to ask for the patient's family history in detail.
  • Patients with MEN1 are characterized by the occurrence of tumors in multiple endocrine tissues and nonendocrine tissues, most frequently parathyroid (95%), enteropancreatic neuroendocrine (50%), and anterior pituitary (40%) tissues.
  • Familiar MEN1 has a high degree of penetrance (80–95%) by the age over 50; however, combinations of the tumors may be different in members of the same family.
  • Patients with EXT1 gene mutations should be monitored for possible transformation of bone lesions into osteochondrosarcoma.

Open access

Roberto Salvatori, Adrian F Daly, Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, Albert Thiry and Albert Beckers

Summary

Heterozygous germline inactivating mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene lead to pituitary adenomas that most frequently present in the setting of familial isolated pituitary adenoma syndrome, usually as somatotropinomas and prolactinomas. More recently, they have been found in a significant percentage of young patients presenting with pituitary macroadenoma without any apparent family history. We describe the case of a 19-year-old man who presented with a gigantic somatotropinoma. His family history was negative. His peripheral DNA showed a heterozygous AIP mutation (p.I13N), while tumor tissue only had the mutated allele, showing loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and suggesting that the mutation caused the disease.

Learning points

  • AIP mutations may be observed in sporadic somatotrope adenomas occurring in young patients.
  • LOH is a strong indicator that an AIP variant is disease causing.
  • Somatotrope adenomas in carriers of AIP mutations are generally larger and more difficult to cure.