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Open access

Eleanor P Thong, Sarah Catford, Julie Fletcher, Phillip Wong, Peter J Fuller, Helena Teede and Frances Milat

Summary

The association between type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and bone health has garnered interest over the years. Fracture risk is known to be increased in individuals with T1DM, although bone health assessment is not often performed in the clinical setting. We describe the case of a 21-year-old male with longstanding T1DM with multilevel vertebral fractures on imaging, after presenting with acute back pain without apparent trauma. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) revealed significantly reduced bone mineral density at the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Extensive investigations for other secondary or genetic causes of osteoporosis were unremarkable, apart from moderate vitamin D deficiency. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography and bone biospy revealed significant alterations of trabecular bone microarchitecture. It later transpired that the patient had sustained vertebral fractures secondary to unrecognised nocturnal hypoglycaemic seizures. Intravenous zoledronic acid was administered for secondary fracture prevention. Despite anti-resorptive therapy, the patient sustained a new vertebral fracture after experiencing another hypoglycaemic seizure in his sleep. Bone health in T1DM is complex and not well understood. There are significant challenges in the assessment and management of osteoporosis in T1DM, particularly in young adults, where fracture prediction tools have not been validated. Clinicians should be aware of hypoglycaemia as a significant risk factor for fracture in patients with T1DM.

Learning points:

  • Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a secondary cause of osteoporosis, characterised by reduced bone mass and disturbed bone microarchitecture.

  • Hypoglycaemic seizures generate sufficient compression forces along the thoracic column and can cause fractures in individuals with compromised bone quality.

  • Unrecognised hypoglycaemic seizures should be considered in patients with T1DM presenting with fractures without a history of trauma.

  • Patients with T1DM have increased fracture risk and risk factors should be addressed. Evaluation of bone microarchitecture may provide further insights into mechanisms of fracture in T1DM.

  • Further research is needed to guide the optimal screening and management of bone health in patients with T1DM.

Open access

Davi da Silva Barbirato, Mariana Fampa Fogacci, Mariana Arruda, Monique Oliveira Rodrigues and Leonardo Vieira Neto

Summary

Osteopetrosis (OP) comprehends a rare group of conditions, presenting on radiographs increased bone density, deriving from irregularities in osteoclast differentiation or function. In the autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO), some patients stay asymptomatic for some time, or only develop mild symptoms. The dental surgeon is often the first to presuppose the disease during routine imaging examinations, referring the patient to a specialized medical group. Furthermore, osteomyelitis is one of the major OP complications, and should be refrained through frequent dental monitoring. Signals of cortical interruption, sclerotic sequestra or periosteal new bone formation, should be looked for in these patients. Their dental management is complex and procedures encompassing bone tissue, such as implant procedures, tissue regenerations, tooth extractions, maxillofacial surgeries and orthodontic treatments, when elected, should be avoided. This case report describes a case of ADO with a diagnosis of moderate generalized chronic periodontitis, not statistically related to plaque index. This is the first case to describe such a condition, in which the systemic component and the altered bone metabolism seem to be related to the loss of periodontal apparatus, independent of the biofilm. Concerning prevention, we can reinforce the need for frequent dental monitoring to avoid further interventions in those cases.

Learning points:

  • This paper reports a case in which the systemic component and the altered bone metabolism seem to have been related to the loss of periodontal attachment apparatus, independent of the biofilm.

  • The periodontal damage observed in the OP patient was not related to the dental plaque, which leads us to suggest that the cases of periodontitis in OP patients should be diagnosed as periodontitis as a manifestation of systemic diseases.

  • The periodontitis prevention should be longed for in OP patients thus, we propose that doctors responsible for patients with OP refer them to a dental service as soon as possible and that dentists should be aware of the preventive dentistry value as well as the most appropriate dental management for those cases.