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Open access

Tanja Miličević, Ivan Žaja, Deša Tešanović and Maja Radman

Summary

Laugier–Hunziker syndrome (LHS) is a rare, benign and acquired disorder characterized by hyperpigmentation of the oral cavity and lips along with longitudinal melanonychia. No underlying systemic abnormalities or malignant predisposition is associated with it. In everyday clinical practice, an endocrinologist encounters certain endocrine conditions (e.g. Addison’s disease, McCune–Albright syndrome) that present with, inter alia, mucocutaneous hyperpigmentation. Even though LHS is easily distinguished from endocrine entities mentioned earlier, diagnostic evaluation usually requires skilled and thorough practitioner. Since it is the diagnosis of exclusion, a number of systemic conditions must be ruled out prior to making the final diagnosis. However, its major differential diagnosis is primarily Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, which carries an increased risk of cancer. Here, we report a case of a young woman who was referred to the endocrinologist for diagnostic evaluation of dark-colored lesions of the oral cavity and nails. All performed laboratory tests were within reference range. Endoscopic gastrointestinal evaluation did not reveal neoplastic formations. Owing to an adult-onset, asymptomatic clinical course and negative diagnostic findings, we made a final diagnosis. In this case, target diagnostic evaluation notably reduced the need for additional expensive and invasive procedures and treatments.

Learning points:

  • Laugier–Hunziker syndrome is a rare, acquired cause of asymptomatic, benign mucocutaneous hyperpigmentation.

  • Prior to making a final diagnosis, certain medical entities with overlapping clinical features must be excluded.

  • Endocrine conditions that usually present with the hyperpigmentation of the skin and mucous membranes (e.g. Addison’s disease, McCune–Albright syndrome) can be easily ruled out based on clinical and laboratory findings.

  • Its major differential diagnosis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is characterized by melanotic macules of the face and mouth, intestinal polyposis and significantly increased risk of different types of cancer, especially gastrointestinal.

  • Anamnesis, physical examination and target diagnostic evaluation reduce the need for additional invasive and expensive procedures and treatment.

Open access

Betty Korljan Jelaska, Sanja Baršić Ostojić, Nina Berović and Višnja Kokić

Summary

Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type I is characterized by impaired production of glucose from glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis resulting in severe hypoglycaemia and increased production of lactic acid, triglyceride and uric acid. The most common type, glycogenosis type Ia, demands a balanced, sufficient carbohydrate intake to preserve normal 24-h glycaemia. Insufficient intake of carbohydrates can cause hypoglycaemia, as the missing glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme cannot free the glucose stored as liver glycogen and nor is gluconeogenesis possible. The principle means of handling this disorder is to avoid starving by taking regular meals during the day and night. Such a dietary regimen could lead to obesity. Herein, we present the case of an adult patient with glycogenosis type Ia suffering from hyperuricaemia, dyslipidaemia and arterial hypertension. The accumulation of these cardiovascular risk factors could lead to the early onset of atherosclerosis, which should be postponed by contemporary methods of surveillance and treatment.

Learning points

  • Continuous subcutaneous glucose monitoring may be of value in every adult patient with GSD type I to evaluate the actual prevalence of eventual hypoglycaemic and hyperglycaemic episodes.

  • Good dietary management minimizes the metabolic abnormalities of the disease and decreases the risk of long-term complications.

  • Treatment of obesity in patients with GSD reduces the risk of earlier atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease.