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Omayma Elshafie Department of Endocrinology, Sultan Qaboos Comprehensive Cancer Care and Research Centre, Muscat, Oman

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Anjali Jain Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sultan Qaboos Comprehensive Cancer Care and Research Centre, Muscat, Oman

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Summit Bichpuria Department of Radiology, Sultan Qaboos Comprehensive Cancer Care and Research Centre, Muscat, Oman

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Yamina Rassou Department of Pathology, Sultan Qaboos Comprehensive Cancer Care and Research Centre, Muscat, Oman

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Syed Furqan Hashmi Department of Radiation Oncology, Sultan Qaboos Comprehensive Cancer Care and Research Centre, Muscat, Oman

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Abir Bou Khalil Department of Endocrinology, Sultan Qaboos Comprehensive Cancer Care and Research Centre, Muscat, Oman

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Summary

A 60-year-old woman presented to our clinic with an acute onset 3 months history of right ankle pain. The patient had a history of poorly differentiated thyroid cancer, which was treated with total thyroidectomy, left lateral neck dissection levels II–V and central neck dissection levels VI–VII followed by postoperative I-131 radioactive iodine (131I) ablation therapy 3.7 GBq 6 months ago. The post-131I WBS showed residual iodine-avid thyroid tissue with no other iodine-avid disease or metastasis. SPECT/CT of the neck and chest showed nonavid bilateral pulmonary nodules, discrete nodal masses in mediastinum and nonavid bone lesions. FDG-PET CT scan showed FDG-avid mediastinal lymph nodes (LN), innumerable non-FDG-avid subcentimetric pulmonary nodules and few FDG-avid lytic lesions in the skeleton. X-ray and MRI of the right ankle showed a well-marginated lytic lesion in the posterior body of calcaneus and 5 × 6 cm soft tissue mass lesion, respectively. The histopathology of the calcaneus mass confirmed a positive immunostaining for thyroid origin which includes thyroglobulin and TTF-1 with PAX-8. Endobronchial mediastinal and bronchial LN biopsy confirmed thyroid cancer metastasis. Gene mutation showed HRAS and GNA13 with a high tumor mutational burden. We describe a rare case of poorly differentiated thyroid cancer in a patient who presented with right ankle pain; we confirmed the cause to be a calcaneus metastasis from the thyroid cancer, with calcaneus being an extremely rare site for bone metastases. Gene mutations points toward treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors.

Learning points

  • Poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma (PDTC) usually metastasizes to lung and bone but can rarely occur in the calcaneus.

  • Patients with distant metastases have significantly worse long-term prognosis.

  • Radiotherapy is effective in reducing the metastatic pains as well as reducing the size of the metastasis.

  • PAX-8 staining can be used to differentiate thyroid carcinomas from lung adenocarcinomas.

  • The importance of searching for gene mutations to decide the treatment of PDTC.

Open access
Dave Duggan Waikato Regional Diabetes Service, Te Whatu Ora Health New Zealand, Hamilton, New Zealand

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Cinthia Minatel Riguetto Waikato Regional Diabetes Service, Te Whatu Ora Health New Zealand, Hamilton, New Zealand

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Summary

There is a scarcity of literature relating to post-bariatric hypoglycaemia (PBH) in pregnancy. Recurrent hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia can have significant consequences for both the mother and the developing fetus. We describe a case of a young pregnant woman who was diagnosed with symptomatic PBH in the second trimester of pregnancy using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) 3 years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. Instigating a low glycaemic index and complex carbohydrate diet significantly improved the patient’s glycaemic excursions. Given that this condition is likely underdiagnosed as a complication of RYGB surgery, a greater awareness of this complication is needed. Patients should be adequately consented pre-operatively for this relatively frequent late surgical complication to enable patients to identify symptoms of this condition at an early stage and seek medical treatment.

Learning points

  • PBH is an important diagnosis in patients post-RYGB surgery, particularly in women of childbearing age when consequences of both hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia during pregnancy can adversely affect both mother and the fetus.

  • Adverse outcomes of recurrent hypoglycaemia to the fetus can include small for gestational age, intrauterine growth restriction and possible impairment of beta cell function.

  • Providing adequate carbohydrate intake to allow growth of the fetus during pregnancy while also attempting to resolve both hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia associated with PBH by reducing the intake of simple carbohydrates and high glycaemic index foods can prove challenging.

  • Patients should be adequately consented for late complications of RYGB surgery such as PBH in order to allow early recognition of symptoms and enable prompt treatment.

Open access
Ishara Ranathunga Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, North Cumbria Integrated Care NHS Foundation Trust, Whitehaven, UK

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Chandima Idampitiya Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, North Cumbria Integrated Care NHS Foundation Trust, Whitehaven, UK

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Summary

Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disorder caused by the destruction of the pancreatic beta cells, which produce insulin. Individuals with T1DM usually require at least 3-5 years to develop microvascular complications in comparison to people with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), who may develop complications even before the diagnosis of diabetes. We discuss a patient who presented with proliferative diabetic retinopathy subsequently diagnosed with T1DM and diabetic neuropathy following investigations. Diabetic retinopathy or other microvascular complications as the presenting feature of T1DM is rarely known or reported in the literature. A 33-year-old healthcare worker had been seen by the opticians due to 1-week history of blurred vision. The ophthalmology assessment had confirmed proliferative retinopathy in the right eye and severe non-proliferative retinopathy in the left eye with bilateral clinically significant macular oedema. His BMI was 24.9 kg/m2. The nervous system examination revealed bilateral stocking type peripheral neuropathy. The random venous glucose was 24.9 mmol/L. Plasma ketones were 0.7 mmol/L and HbA1c was 137 mmol/mol. On further evaluation, the anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody was positive, confirming the diagnosis of T1DM. He was started on aflibercept injections in both eyes, followed by panretinal photocoagulation. Subsequent nerve conduction studies confirmed the presence of symmetrical polyneuropathy. The pathogenesis of the development of microvascular complications in T1DM is multifactorial. Usually, the development of complications is seen at least a few years following the diagnosis. The occurrence of microvascular complications at presentation is rare. This makes the management challenging and extremely important in preventing the progression of the disease.

Learning points

  • The pathogenesis of the development of microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus is multifactorial.

  • The development of complications is seen at least a few years following the diagnosis.

  • Occurrence of microvascular complications at presentation is rare.

  • This makes the management challenging and extremely important to prevent the progression of the disease.

Open access
Clemens Gardemann FH Münster Oecotrophologie, Münster, Germany
Clinic for Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine/Metabolism Laboratory, Universitätsklinikum Münster, Münster, Germany

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Sonja Knowles FH Münster Oecotrophologie, Münster, Germany

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Thorsten Marquardt Clinic for Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine/Metabolism Laboratory, Universitätsklinikum Münster, Münster, Germany

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Summary

Traditional guidelines for type 1 diabetics do not restrict carbohydrates to improve clinical outcomes for patients. This paper highlights the favorable blood glucose control outcomes when a type 1 diabetic focuses on caloric intake from protein and healthy fats instead of the traditional carbohydrate-focused meals. We followed a male type 1 diabetic in his 20s adopting a ketogenic diet through a process of slowly lowering total daily carbohydrate intake. Diabetes-related biomarkers were measured throughout the process. Diabetes-related biomarkers saw massive improvements and ended up in the official non-diabetic range. Total daily insulin requirements dropped by 70%. The patient also experienced great improvements in his quality of life. This study demonstrates the possibility of improving diabetes-related biomarkers through dietary changes, which have positive effects on health outcomes in patients living with this disease.

Learning points

  • The adaptation of a ketogenic diet improved diabetes-related biomarkers in this patient.

  • Diabetes-related biomarkers, such as HbA1c, are the main risk factors for developing complications in diabetics.

  • The ketogenic diet is a feasible approach to minimizing the risk of developing complications in diabetics.

  • Total daily insulin requirements dropped by 67% adapting a ketogenic diet.

  • The patient experienced enormous changes in the quality of life after adapting to the new diet.

  • The safe and physiological state of ketosis might be associated with additional benefits for the patient

Open access
Nam Quang Tran Department of Endocrinology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy at Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Department of Endocrinology, University Medical Center at Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

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Chien Cong Phan Department of Imaging, University Medical Center at Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

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Tran Bao Vuong Department of Endocrinology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy at Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

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Thang Viet Tran Department of Endocrinology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy at Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Department of Endocrinology, University Medical Center at Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

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Phat Tung Ma Department of Endocrinology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy at Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Department of Endocrinology, University Medical Center at Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

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Summary

Mitochondrial diseases are a group of rare diseases presenting with heterogeneous clinical, biochemical, and genetic disorders caused by mutations in the mitochondrial or nuclear genome. Multiple organs can be affected, particularly those with high energy demand. Diabetes is a common endocrine manifestation of mitochondrial diseases. The onset of mitochondrial diabetes can be latent or acute, and the presenting phenotype can be type 1- or type 2-like. Studies show that diabetes ais associated with latent progression of cognitive decline in patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome. Herein, we report a case of rapid cognitive decline after the acute onset of diabetes in a patient with MELAS syndrome. The patient was a 36-year-old woman who was hospitalized due to hyperglycemic crisis and seizures. She was diagnosed with MELAS syndrome two years previously, and had gradually progressing dementia and hearing loss. However, following the acute onset of diabetes, she developed rapid cognitive decline and loss of ability to perform daily activities. In conclusion, the acute onset of diabetes could be an associated risk factor for rapid cognitive decline in patients with MELAS syndrome. Thus, these patients as well as healthy carriers with related genetic mutations should undergo diabetes education and screening tests. Moreover, clinicians should be aware of the possibility for acute onset of hyperglycemic crisis, particularly in the presence of triggering factors.

Learning points

  • Diabetes is a common endocrine manifestation of mitochondrial diseases, presenting with a type 1- or type 2-like phenotype depending on the level of insulinopenia.

  • Metformin should be avoided in patients with mitochondrial diseases to prevent metformin-induced lactic acidosis.

  • Mitochondrial diabetes can manifest before or after the onset of MELAS syndrome.

  • In patients with MELAS syndrome, diabetes can initially manifest with a life-threatening severe hyperglycemic crisis and can cause rapid cognitive decline.

  • Diabetes screening tests (e.g. hemoglobin A1c, oral glucose tolerance test, or random blood glucose level measurement) should be performed either systematically or in the presence of symptoms, particularly after triggering events.

  • Genetic testing and counseling should be provided to patients and their families for the purpose of better understanding the inheritance, progression, and possible outcomes of the disease.

Open access
Toshitaka Sawamura Department of Internal Medicine, Asanogawa General Hospital, Kosakamachinaka, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medicine, Takaramachi, Kanazawa, Japan
Department of Health Promotion and Medicine of the Future, Kanazawa University, Takaramachi, Kanazawa, Japan

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Shigehiro Karashima Department of Health Promotion and Medicine of the Future, Kanazawa University, Takaramachi, Kanazawa, Japan

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Ai Ohmori Department of Internal Medicine, Asanogawa General Hospital, Kosakamachinaka, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medicine, Takaramachi, Kanazawa, Japan

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Kei Sawada Department of Internal Medicine, Asanogawa General Hospital, Kosakamachinaka, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan

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Daisuke Aono Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medicine, Takaramachi, Kanazawa, Japan
Department of Health Promotion and Medicine of the Future, Kanazawa University, Takaramachi, Kanazawa, Japan

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Mitsuhiro Kometani Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medicine, Takaramachi, Kanazawa, Japan
Department of Health Promotion and Medicine of the Future, Kanazawa University, Takaramachi, Kanazawa, Japan

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Yoshiyu Takeda Department of Internal Medicine, Asanogawa General Hospital, Kosakamachinaka, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan

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Takashi Yoneda Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medicine, Takaramachi, Kanazawa, Japan
Department of Health Promotion and Medicine of the Future, Kanazawa University, Takaramachi, Kanazawa, Japan

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Summary

Fulminant type 1 diabetes (FT1D) is a subtype of diabetes characterized by rapid progression of β-cell destruction, hyperglycemia, and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). The pathogenesis of this disease remains unclear. However, viral infections, HLA genes, and immune checkpoint inhibitor use were reportedly involved in this disease. A 51-year-old Japanese man with no chronic medical condition was admitted to our hospital with complaints of nausea and vomiting. Cough, sore throat, nasal discharge, and diarrhea were not noted. He had a medical history of at least two influenza infections. His vaccination history was notable for receiving an inactive split influenza vaccine 12 days prior to developing these symptoms. He was diagnosed with DKA associated with FT1D. His HLA class II genotypes were nonsusceptible to FT1D, and he had a negative history of immune checkpoint inhibitor use. The destruction of the pancreas by cytotoxic T cells is reported to be involved in FT1D. Inactive split influenza vaccines do not directly activate cytotoxic T cells. However, these could activate the redifferentiation of memory CD8-positive T cells into cytotoxic T cells and induce FT1D, as this patient had a history of influenza infections.

Learning points

  • Influenza split vaccination could cause fulminant type 1 diabetes (FT1D).

  • The mechanism of influenza split vaccine-induced FT1D might be through the redifferentiation of CD8-positive memory T cells into cytotoxic T cells.

Open access
Wafa Belabed Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Hedi Chaker University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia

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Fatma Mnif Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Hedi Chaker University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia

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Abdel Mouhaymen Missaoui Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Hedi Chaker University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia

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Mouna Elleuch Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Hedi Chaker University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia

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Dhoha Ben Salah Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Hedi Chaker University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia

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Nadia Charfi Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Hedi Chaker University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia

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Mouna Mnif Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Hedi Chaker University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia

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Nabila Rekik Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Hedi Chaker University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia

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Faten Hadj Kacem Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Hedi Chaker University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia

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Mohamed Abid Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Hedi Chaker University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia

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Summary

A 55-year-old patient was admitted to our department for the management of a repetitive alteration of consciousness. Biological investigation results were consistent with endogenous hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Insulinoma was therefore suspected. Abdominal computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed no obvious pancreatic mass.Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy showed abnormal radioactive uptake in both the pancreatic tail and the uncinate process. Contrariwise, abdominal magnetic resonance imaging showed a unique lesion in the pancreas tail. The patient was then proposed for pancreatic surgery. Both intraoperative manual palpation and intraoperative ultrasonography of the pancreas showed a single corporal lesion of 1.5 cm. No lesion was found in the uncinate process. After a left pancreatectomy, the lesion was histopathologically confirmed to be a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. The symptoms of the patient resolved almost immediately following the surgery. The follow-up is one and a half years to date.

Learning points

  • The exact preoperative localization of the pancreatic mass remains the most challenging part of insulinoma diagnostic workup.

  • The radiologist’s experience is the best warrantor to a precise localization of the tumor.

  • 111In-DTPA-octreotide uptake in the pancreatic uncinate process may be physiological and its interpretation must, therefore, be vigilant.

  • Manual palpation along with intraoperative ultrasonography is considered as the most effective method for the localization of insulinomas during open surgery.

Open access
Valerie Lai Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada

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Mariam Shahidi Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada

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Alicia Chan Department of Medical Genetics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada

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Shailly Jain-Ghai Department of Medical Genetics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada

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Summary

3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) lyase deficiency is an inborn error of metabolism resulting in a lack of ketogenesis and leucine catabolism. Hallmarks of decompensation include hypoglycemia without ketosis (or hypoketosis), metabolic acidosis, and hyperammonemia. Management includes avoiding fasting and restricting dietary protein and fat. Conversely, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) requires carbohydrate restriction and/or anti-hyperglycemic agents; thus, managing these co-existing disorders is challenging. A 36-year-old male with HMG-CoA lyase deficiency and T2DM (Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c): 7.9%) presented with confusion and shock. Blood work revealed metabolic acidosis, hyperammonemia, hyperglycemia, and hypoketosis. The patient was diagnosed with hyperosmolar non-ketotic hyperglycemia and hyperammonemia secondary to HMG-CoA lyase metabolic decompensation requiring intensive care unit admission. Hyperammonemia management was challenging because alternative calories with i.v. dextrose (due to hyperglycemia) and i.v. lipids (due to HMG-CoA lyase deficiency) could not be provided as usual. The patient was started on hemodialysis and i.v. insulin with marked improvement. Once stabilized, metformin and insulin were initiated. T2DM impaired cellular glucose uptake and produced a state similar to hypoglycemia, despite the patient being profoundly hyperglycemic, which led to metabolic decompensation of HMG-CoA lyase deficiency. Managing T2DM and HMG-CoA lyase deficiency warrants special considerations due to the potential for metabolic decompensation with both hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia.

Learning points

  • In a patient with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) lyase deficiency and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), management principles include avoiding hypoglycemia to prevent metabolic decompensation, providing insulin for proper glucose utilization, and moderation of carbohydrate intake to prevent consequences of chronic hyperglycemia.

  • The development of insulin resistance in the form of T2DM in HMG-CoA lyase deficiency likely triggered a state similar to hypoglycemia, leading to cellular energy deficiency and subsequently metabolic decompensation.

  • It is important to avoid hypoglycemia in patients with HMG-CoA lyase deficiency and T2DM, as the risk of metabolic decompensation is increased due to the lack of ketogenesis in HMG-CoA lyase deficiency.

  • Selection of antidiabetic agents in this patient population requires careful consideration, and agents that have a higher risk of hypoglycemia should be avoided.

Open access
Cun An Phang Cun An PHANG Medical Student, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

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Shejil Kumar Shejil KUMAR Endocrinology Advanced Trainee, St George Hospital, Sydney, Australia

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Peter Rohl Peter ROHL Staff Specialist in Endocrinology, St George Hospital, Sydney, Australia

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Summary

The rapid rise in the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors as systemic cancer therapy has seen the emergence of immunotherapy-induced diabetes, a severe irreversible immunotherapy-related adverse event. Affected patients typically present with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and low C-peptide consistent with insulin deficiency secondary to autoimmune β-cell destruction. We present the unusual case of a 61-year-old female with metastatic ampullary duodenal adenocarcinoma with primary tumour adjacent to the pancreatic head. She was commenced on immunotherapy after conventional systemic chemotherapy. Acute-onset hyperglycaemia was detected after 7 weeks on weekly blood glucose monitoring, with no glucocorticoid use or prior history of diabetes. On presentation, there was no evidence of DKA, and her glycated haemoglobin level was within the normal non-diabetic range at 5.3%, reflecting the acuity of her presentation. Initial serum C-peptide was preserved; however, it became undetectable a few weeks later, confirming insulin deficiency. We describe a case of atypical presentation of immunotherapy-induced diabetes, review the existing literature on this emerging clinical entity and discuss the differential diagnosis for new-onset diabetes mellitus in patients with metastatic cancer.

Learning points

  • Regular proactive glycaemic monitoring in patients receiving immunotherapy, particularly antibodies against programmed death ligand 1 and PD1, can facilitate very early detection of immunotherapy-induced diabetes, prompting insulin commencement and avoiding life-threatening presentations of diabetic ketoacidosis.

  • Glycated haemoglobin can be within the normal range in patients diagnosed acutely with immunotherapy-induced diabetes.

  • Serum C-peptide can be preserved initially in patients diagnosed with immunotherapy-induced diabetes but is likely to become undetectable during their illness.

  • New-onset diabetes in patients with metastatic cancer carries a broad differential diagnosis.

Open access
Raad Alwithenani Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
College of Medicine, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Department of Medicine, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

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Danielle M Andrade Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

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Lingxin Zhang Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

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Karen E Gomez-Hernandez Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

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Summary

Myopathy caused by thyrotoxicosis is not uncommon. Skeletal muscles are commonly involved, but dysphagia is a rare manifestation of thyrotoxicosis. We aim to raise awareness of dysphagia caused by hyperthyroidism and review similar cases in the literature. We present a case of severe dysphagia caused by hyperthyroidism. We also summarize similar case reports in the literature. Our patient is a 77-year-old man who presented with thyrotoxicosis related to Graves’ disease (GD), dysphagia to both liquid and solid food, and weight loss. Further investigations revealed severe esophageal dysphagia and a high risk for aspiration. He required the placement of a G-tube for feeding. After 8 weeks of methimazole treatment, his thyroid function normalized and his dysphagia improved significantly, leading to the removal of the feeding G-tube. We summarize 19 case reports published in the literature of hyperthyroidism leading to dysphagia. Patients with thyrotoxicosis and dysphagia are at higher risk for aspiration pneumonia and thyroid storm. Based on previous case reports, on average, approximately 3 weeks of treatment with anti-thyroidal drugs and beta-blockers is needed before patients can eat normally. We report a case of dysphagia associated with GD, which is rare and needs prompt recognition to restore euthyroid status. Dysphagia generally resolved with normalization of thyroid function.

Learning points

  • Myopathy caused by thyrotoxicosis is not uncommon.

  • Skeletal muscles are commonly involved, but dysphagia is a rare manifestation of thyrotoxicosis.

  • Dysphagia due to hyperthyroidism resolves with normalization of thyroid function.

  • Early recognition of dysphagia related to hyperthyroidism and early initiation of therapy may help reverse the dysphagia and prevent complications.

Open access