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Alessandra Mangone Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
Endocrinology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy
Institute of Metabolism and System Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK

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Quratulain Yousuf University Hospitals of North Midlands NHS Trust, Stoke-on-Trent, UK

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Wiebke Arlt Institute of Metabolism and System Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
Centre for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Birmingham Health Partners, Birmingham, UK

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Alessandro Prete Institute of Metabolism and System Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
Centre for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Birmingham Health Partners, Birmingham, UK

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Fozia Shaheen Institute of Metabolism and System Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK

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Senthil-kumar Krishnasamy Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust, Walsall, UK

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Yasir S Elhassan Institute of Metabolism and System Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
Centre for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Birmingham Health Partners, Birmingham, UK

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Cristina L Ronchi Institute of Metabolism and System Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
Centre for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Birmingham Health Partners, Birmingham, UK
Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Hospital of Wurzburg, Wurzburg, Germany

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Summary

The spectrum of endocrine-related complications of COVID-19 infection is expanding; one of the most concerning of which is adrenal haemorrhage due to the risk of catastrophic adrenal crisis. In this study, we present a case that highlights the challenging management of a large, indeterminate unilateral adrenal mass during pregnancy and draws attention to a rare yet probably underestimated complication of COVID-19. During hospitalization for severe COVID-19 pneumonia, a 26-year-old woman was incidentally found to have a 12.5 cm heterogeneous left adrenal mass. Soon after the discovery, she became pregnant and upon referral, she was in the seventh week of gestation, without clinical or biochemical features of hormonal excess. The uncertainty of the diagnosis and the risks of malignancy and surgical intervention were discussed with the patient, and a period of radiological surveillance was agreed upon. An MRI scan performed 3 months later showed a size reduction of the adrenal lesion to 7.9 cm, which was against malignancy. A Doppler ultrasound showed a non-vascular, well-defined round lesion consistent with an adrenal haematoma, likely a complication of the recent COVID-19 infection. The multidisciplinary team recommended further radiological follow-up. The patient then spontaneously had miscarriage at 12 weeks gestation. Subsequent radiological surveillance showed a further size reduction of the adrenal lesion to 5.5 cm. The patient conceived again during follow-up, and the repeated Doppler ultrasound showed stable appearances of the adrenal mass, and thus, it was agreed to continue radiological monitoring after delivery. The pregnancy was uneventful, and the patient delivered a healthy baby. An MRI scan performed after delivery showed a stable but persistent lesion consistent with a likely underlying adrenal lesion.

Learning points

  • Unilateral adrenal haemorrhage can occur as a complication of COVID-19 and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of heterogeneous adrenal masses if there is a history of recent infection.

  • Management of large indeterminate adrenal masses during pregnancy poses several challenges and should be led by an experienced multidisciplinary team.

  • Underlying adrenal tumours may trigger non-traumatic haemorrhages, especially if exacerbated by stressful illness.

Open access
Evangelos Karvounis Department of Endocrine Surgery, ‘Euroclinic’ Hospital, Athens, Greece

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Ioannis Zoupas Department of Endocrine Surgery, ‘Euroclinic’ Hospital, Athens, Greece

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Dimitra Bantouna Private Practice, Patras, Greece

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Rodis D Paparodis Private Practice, Patras, Greece
Center for Diabetes and Endocrine Research, University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, Toledo, Ohio, USA

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Roxani Efthymiadou PET-CT Department, Hygeia Hospital, Athens, Greece

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Christina Ioakimidou Department of Pathology

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Christos Panopoulos Department of Medical Oncology, ‘Euroclinic’ Hospital, Athens, Greece

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Summary

Large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) is a rare neuroendocrine prostatic malignancy. It usually arises after androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), while de novo cases are even more infrequent, with only six cases described. The patient was a 78-year-old man with no history of ADT who presented with cervical lymphadenopathy. Diagnostic approaches included PET/CT, MRI, CT scans, ultrasonography, biopsies, and cytological and immunohistochemical evaluations. Results showed a poorly differentiated carcinoma in the thyroid gland accompanied by cervical lymph node enlargement. Thyroid surgery revealed LCNEC metastasis to the thyroid gland. Additional metastases were identified in both the adrenal glands. Despite appropriate treatment, the patient died of the disease. De novo LCNEC of the prostate is a rare, highly aggressive tumor with a poor prognosis. It is resistant to most therapeutic agents, has a high metastatic potential, and is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Further studies are required to characterize this tumor.

Learning points

  • De novo LCNECs of the prostate gland can metastasize almost anywhere in the body, including the thyroid and adrenal glands.

  • LCNECs of the prostate are usually associated with androgen-depriving therapy, but de novo cases are also notable and should be accounted for.

  • Further studies are required to fully understand and treat LCNECs more effectively.

Open access
Iris Dirven Department of Endocrinology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium

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Bert Bravenboer Department of Endocrinology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium

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Steven Raeymaeckers Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium

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Corina E Andreescu Department of Endocrinology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium

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Summary

The Covid-19 vaccination has been rapidly implemented among patients with cancer. We present two cases of patients with endocrine tumours who developed lymphadenopathy following a Covid-19 vaccination. In the case of a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) 1 syndrome, an 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG)-PET/CT showed positive axillary lymph nodes. Further work-up with fine needle aspiration showed a reactive pattern following a Covid-19 vaccination in the ipsilateral arm shortly before the 18FDG-PET/CT. A second patient, in follow-up for thyroid cancer, developed clinical supraclavicular lymphadenopathy after a Covid-19 vaccination. Follow-up ultrasound proved the lesion to be transient. These cases demonstrate lymphadenopathy in response to a Covid-19 vaccination in two patients susceptible to endocrine tumours and metastatic disease. With growing evidence about the pattern and occurrence of lymphadenopathy after mRNA Covid-19 vaccination, recommendations for scheduling and interpretation of imaging among cancer patients should be implemented to reduce equivocal findings, overdiagnosis, and overtreatment, while maintaining a good standard of care in oncological follow-up.

Learning points

  • Reactive lymphadenopathy is very common after an mRNA vaccination against Covid-19 and should be part of the differential diagnosis in patients with endocrine tumours who recently received a Covid-19 mRNA vaccination and present with an ipsilateral lymphadenopathy.

  • A good vaccine history is essential in assessing the risk for lymphadenopathy and if possible, screening imaging in patients with endocrine tumours should be postponed at least 6 weeks after the previous vaccination.

  • For now, a multidisciplinary care approach is recommended to determine the necessary steps in the diagnostic evaluation of lymphadenopathy in the proximity of a Covid-19 vaccination.

Open access
N Ayub Department of Endocrine Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands

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A J A T Braat Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands

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H J L M Timmers Departments of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands

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M G E H Lam Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands

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R S van Leeuwaarde Department of Endocrine Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands