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Nikitas S Skarakis Unit of Endocrinology and Diabetes Center, ‘G. Gennimatas’ General Hospital, Athens, Greece

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Irene Papadimitriou Unit of Endocrinology and Diabetes Center, ‘G. Gennimatas’ General Hospital, Athens, Greece

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Labrini Papanastasiou Unit of Endocrinology and Diabetes Center, ‘G. Gennimatas’ General Hospital, Athens, Greece

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Sofia Pappa Department of Pathology, ‘G. Gennimatas’ General Hospital, Athens, Greece

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Anastasia Dimitriadi Department of Pathology, ‘G. Gennimatas’ General Hospital, Athens, Greece

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Ioannis Glykas Department of Urology, General Hospital of Athens ‘G Gennimatas’, Athens, Greece

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Konstantinos Ntoumas Department of Urology, General Hospital of Athens ‘G Gennimatas’, Athens, Greece

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Penelope Lampropoulou Department of Radiology, General Hospital of Athens ‘G Gennimatas’, Athens, Greece

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Theodora Kounadi Unit of Endocrinology and Diabetes Center, ‘G. Gennimatas’ General Hospital, Athens, Greece

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Summary

Juxtaglomerular cell tumour (JGCT) is an unusually encountered clinical entity. A 33-year-old man with severe long-standing hypertension and hypokalaemia is described. The patient also suffered from polyuria, polydipsia, nocturia and severe headaches. On admission, laboratory investigation revealed hypokalaemia, kaliuresis, high aldosterone and renin levels, and the abdomen CT identified a mass of 4 cm at the right kidney. Kidney function was normal. Following nephrectomy, the histological investigation revealed the presence of a JGCT. Immunostaining was positive for CD34 as well as for smooth muscle actin and vimentin. Following surgery, a marked control of his hypertension with calcium channel blockers and normalization of the serum potassium, renin or aldosterone levels were reached. According to our findings, JGCT could be included in the differential diagnosis of secondary hypertension as it consists of a curable cause. The association of JGCT with hypertension and hypokalaemia focusing on the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation and management is herein discussed and a brief review of the existing literature is provided.

Learning points

  • Juxtaglomerular cell tumours (JGCT), despite their rarity, should be included in the differential diagnosis of secondary hypertension as they consist of a curable cause of hypertension.

  • JGCT could be presented with resistant hypertension along with hypokalaemia, kaliuresis and metabolic alkalosis. Early recognition and management can help to prevent cardiovascular complications.

  • Imaging (enhanced CT scans) may be considered as the primary diagnostic tool for the detection of renal or JGCT.

  • For the confirmation of the diagnosis, a histopathologic examination is needed.

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Clare E Bonnar Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism

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John F Brazil Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism

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Julie O Okiro Department of Nephrology, Endocrinology & Metabolism

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Louise Giblin Department of Nephrology, Endocrinology & Metabolism

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Yvonne Smyth Department of Cardiology, Galway, Ireland

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Paula M O’Shea Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Galway University Hospitals, Saolta University Healthcare Group, Galway, Ireland

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Francis M Finucane Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism

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Summary

A 32-year-old Caucasian male presented to the emergency department with a one-day history of acute severe bilateral lower limb weakness, three days after competing in a bodybuilding competition. He consumed large quantities of carbohydrate-rich foods following the competition. His past medical history was significant for anxiety, and family history was non-contributory. Examination was normal except for reduced power and hyporeflexia in both legs, despite his muscular physique. He was noted to have severe hypokalaemia (K+= 1.9 mmol/L). His thyroid function tests were consistent with thyrotoxicosis. He reported taking thyroxine and several other agents to facilitate muscle mass generation before the bodybuilding competition. His presentation was reminiscent of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis, albeit uncommon with Caucasian ethnicity. He also had transient hyperglycaemia at presentation with concomitant hyperinsulinaemia, which could be attributed to the carbohydrate load and may have exacerbated his hypokalaemia through a transcellular shift. Urine toxicology screen subsequently ruled out the use of diuretics but confirmed the presence of a long-acting beta agonist (clenbuterol) which, along with other substances, may have aggravated the hypokalaemia further. After 12 h of i.v. replacement, the potassium level normalised and leg weakness resolved. The patient agreed to stop taking thyroxine and beta agonists and was well during the clinic visit at one month follow-up. This case highlights the potential for thyrotoxicosis factitia to exacerbate hypokalaemia and muscle weakness from other causes in bodybuilders presenting with acute severe weakness, irrespective of ethnicity.

Learning points

  • In patients presenting with muscle weakness and hypokalaemia, early consideration of thyrotoxicosis is essential, even in the absence of a past history of thyroid disease or specific symptoms of thyrotoxicosis, in order to allow prompt initiation of appropriate treatment and to prevent recurrence.

  • Bodybuilders may constitute a uniquely ‘at-risk’ group for thyrotoxic periodic paralysis secondary to thyrotoxicosis factitia, especially where there is concomitant use of beta-adrenergic agonists, even in the absence of diuretic use.

  • Although rare and usually described in patients of Asian or Polynesian ethnicity, this case highlights that thyrotoxic periodic paralysis secondary to thyrotoxicosis factitia can also occur in patients with Caucasian ethnicity.

  • We speculate that consuming large quantities of carbohydrates may induce hyperinsulinaemia, which could theoretically contribute to worse hypokalaemia, though mechanistic studies would be needed to explore this further.

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Lachlan M Angus Department of Endocrinology, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Medicine, Austin Health, The University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia

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Jun Yang Centre for Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hudson Institute of Medical Research, Victoria, Australia
Department of Medicine, Monash University, Victoria, Australia

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Ada S Cheung Department of Endocrinology, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Medicine, Austin Health, The University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia

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Summary

Primary aldosteronism is one of the most common (affecting up to 10%) yet treatable causes of hypertension in our community, notable due to an associated elevated risk of atrial fibrillation, stroke and myocardial infarction compared to essential hypertension. Guidelines have focussed on improving case detection due to significant underdiagnosis in the community. While our case experienced significant delay in diagnosis, we highlight a state of protracted, persistent post-operative hypoaldosteronism which manifested with severe hyponatraemia and hyperkalaemia, necessitating long-term mineralocorticoid replacement. We discuss whether pre-operative mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists to stimulate aldosterone secretion from the contralateral gland may have prevented this complication.

Learning points

  • Hypoaldosteronism is an uncommon complication of adrenalectomy for primary aldosteronism, typically manifesting with hyperkalaemia and hyponatraemia. While most cases are transient, it may be persistent, necessitating ongoing mineralocorticoid replacement.

  • Routine electrolyte monitoring is recommended post-adrenalectomy.

  • Risk factors for hypoaldosteronism include age >50 years, duration of hypertension >10 years, pre-existing renal impairment and adrenal adenoma size >2 cm.

  • Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists may assist in the management of hypokalaemia and hypertension pre-operatively. However, it is unclear whether this reduces the risk of post-operative hypoaldosteronism.

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Ryizan Nizar Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Southmead Hospital, North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol, UK

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Nathan W P Cantley Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Southmead Hospital, North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol, UK

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Jonathan C Y Tang Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, UK

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Summary

A 33-year-old gentleman of Egyptian heritage presented with a 21 years history of unexplained and recurrent hypercalcaemia, nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, and myocarditis. A similar history was also found in two first-degree relatives. Further investigation into the vitamin D metabolism pathway identified the biochemical hallmarks of infantile hypercalcaemia type 1 (IIH). A homozygous, likely pathogenic, variant in CYP24A1 was found on molecular genetic analysis confirming the diagnosis. Management now focuses on removing excess vitamin D from the metabolic pathway as well as reducing calcium intake to achieve serum-adjusted calcium to the middle of the reference range. If undiagnosed, IIH can cause serious renal complications and metabolic bone disease.

Learning points

  • Infantile hypercalcaemia type 1 (IIH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by homozygous mutations in the CYP24A1 gene that encodes the 24-hydroxylase enzyme used to convert active vitamin D metabolites such as 1,25-(OH)2-vitamin D into their inactive form.

  • IIH should be questioned in individuals presenting with a history of unexplained hypercalcaemia, especially if presenting from childhood and/or where there is an accompanying family history of the same in first and/or second degree relatives, causing complications such as nephrocalcinosis, pericarditis, and calcium-based nephrolithiasis.

  • Associated biochemistry of IIH is persistent mild to moderate hypercalcaemia, normal or raised 25-(OH)-vitamin D and elevated 1,25-(OH)2-vitamin D. An elevated ratio of 25-(OH)-vitamin D to 24,25-(OH)2-vitamin D can be a useful marker of defects in the 24-hydroxylase enzyme, whose measurement can be facilitated through the supra-regional assay service.

  • Management should focus on limiting the amount of vitamin D introduced into the body either via sunlight exposure or supplementation in addition to calcium dietary restriction to try and maintain appropriate calcium homeostasis

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Ayesha Ghayur Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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Qurrat Elahi Department of Family Medicine, Pikeville Medicine Center, Pikeville, Kentucky, USA

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Chinmay Patel Department of Nephrology, Southern Kidney Associates, Shreveport, LA, USA

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Rishi Raj Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Pikeville Medical Center, Pikeville, Kentucky, USA

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Summary

Hypothyroidism is a common medical condition and is often easily managed with excellent outcomes, when treated adequately. Compliance with levothyroxine (LT4) therapy is often compromised because of the need for a daily and lasting schedule. Overt rhabdomyolysis due to under-treatment or non-compliance is a rare occurrence. We report a case of rhabdomyolysis leading to acute kidney injury (AKI) on chronic kidney disease (CKD) requiring hemodialysis (HD) in a 68-year-old Caucasian male due to non-compliance with levothyroxine (LT4) therapy. Our patient 'ran out of levothyroxine' for approximately 4 weeks and developed gradually progressive muscle pain. The diagnosis of severe AKI due to rhabdomyolysis was made based on oliguria, elevated creatinine kinase (CK), and renal failure. Resuming the home dose of LT4 failed to correct CK levels, and there was a progressive decline in renal function. Although increasing doses of LT4 and three cycles of HD improved CK levels, they remained above baseline at the time of discharge. The patient recovered gradually and required HD for 4 weeks. CK levels normalized at 6 weeks. Through this case report, we highlight that non-compliance with LT4 therapy can lead to life-threatening complications such as renal failure and hence the need to educate patients on the significance of compliance with LT4 therapy should be addressed.

Learning points

  • Non-compliance to levothyroxine therapy is common and can lead to serious complications, including rhabdomyolysis.

  • Rhabdomyolysis is an uncommon presentation of hypothyroidism and severe rhabdomyolysis can result in renal failure requiring hemodialysis.

  • Rhabdomyolysis associated with hypothyroidism can be further exacerbated by concomitant use of statins.

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Asmahan Abdalla Department of Pediatric Endocrinologist, Gaafar Ibn Auf Children’s Tertiary Hospital, Khartoum, Sudan

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Mohammed Abdulrahman Alhassan Department of Pediatrics, Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, Alkharj, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

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Reem Tawfeeg Department of Pediatric Respirologist, Elswaidi Charity Hospital, Khartoum, Sudan

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Ayman Sanad Department of Pediatrics, University of Shendi, Shendi, Sudan

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Hasan Tawamie Clinical Lab Operations at Centogene Laboratory, Rostock, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany

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Mohamed Abdullah Departmentof Pediatric Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan

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Summary

Systemic pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1) is a rare genetic syndrome of tissue unresponsiveness to aldosterone caused by mutations affecting the epithelial Na channel (ENaC). The classical presentation is life-threatening neonatal/infantile salt-losing crises that mimic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). Consistently, extra-renal manifestations, including respiratory symptoms that resemble cystic fibrosis, are well reported. Clinical diagnosis is made by the presence of hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, metabolic acidosis, respiratory symptoms, evidence of high renal and extra-renal salt loss in addition to high plasma renin and aldosterone levels. We herein report a novel manifestation of PHA1: episodic dyslipidemia in a 7-month-old Sudanese boy that occurred during the salt-losing crises. Whole exome sequencing of the patient revealed one homozygous missense variant c.1636G>A p.(Asp546Asn) in the SCNN1B gene, confirming our clinical and laboratory findings that were compatible with PHA1. This report aims to highlight the possible explanation of dyslipidemia in PHA1 and its expected consequences in the long term.

Learning points

  • A child presenting with features that mimic salt-losing congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) crises that do not respond to glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid therapy should alert the pediatricians to the possibility of end-organ resistance to aldosterone.

  • Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1) can be diagnosed even in the absence of advanced laboratory investigations.

  • To our knowledge, this is the first case of systemic PHA1 to have a documented episodic dyslipidemia (primarily as marked hypertriglyceridemia).

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Katsuo Tao Department of Pediatrics, Fukui Aiiku Hospital, Fukui, Japan

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Midori Awazu Department of Pediatrics, Keio University School of Medicine, shinjyuku, Tokyo, Japan

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Misa Honda Department of Pediatrics, Keio University School of Medicine, shinjyuku, Tokyo, Japan

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Hironori Shibata Department of Pediatrics, Keio University School of Medicine, shinjyuku, Tokyo, Japan

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Takayasu Mori Department of Nephrology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Fukui, Japan

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Shinichi Uchida Department of Nephrology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Fukui, Japan

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Tomonobu Hasegawa Department of Pediatrics, Keio University School of Medicine, shinjyuku, Tokyo, Japan

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Tomohiro Ishii Department of Pediatrics, Keio University School of Medicine, shinjyuku, Tokyo, Japan

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Summary

We report a male infant with congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) who presented with hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia since birth. Serum sodium started to increase at 39 days. Although there was no polyuria, urine osmolality was 71 mOsm/kg, when serum osmolality was 296 mOsm/kg with plasma arginine vasopressin 22.5 pg/mL. He was thus diagnosed as NDI. An undetectable level of urine calcium and unsuppressed intact parathyroid hormone suggested hyperparathyroidism including calcium-sensing receptor mutations that could cause hypercalcemia-induced NDI. Polyuria became apparent after the initiation of i.v. infusion for the treatment of hypernatremia. Low calcium and low sodium formula with hypotonic fluid infusion did not correct hypernatremia, hypercalcemia, or hyperphosphatemia. Hydrochlorothiazide and subsequently added celecoxib effectively decreased urine output and corrected electrolytes abnormalities. Normal serum electrolytes were maintained after the discontinuation of low calcium formula. The genetic analysis revealed a large deletion of the arginine vasopressin receptor-2 (AVPR2) gene but no pathogenic variant in the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) gene. Whether hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia were caused by dehydration alone or in combination with other mechanisms remains to be clarified.

Learning points

  • Congenital NDI can present with neonatal hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia.

  • Hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia can be treated with low calcium and low sodium formula, hydration, hydrochlorothiazide, and celecoxib.

  • Genetic testing is sometimes necessary in the differentiating diagnosis of hypercalcemia associated with NDI.

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Rachel Wurth Section on Endocrinology and Genetics, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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Abhishek Jha Section on Medical Neuroendocrinology, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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Crystal Kamilaris Section on Endocrinology and Genetics, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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Anthony J Gill Cancer Diagnosis and Pathology Group, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, Royal North Shore Hospital St Leonards NSW 2065 Australian and Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

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Nicola Poplawski Adult Genetics Unit, Royal Adelaide Hospital
Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

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Paraskevi Xekouki Section on Endocrinology and Genetics, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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Martha M Quezado Laboratory of Pathology Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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Karel Pacak Section on Medical Neuroendocrinology, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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Constantine A Stratakis Section on Endocrinology and Genetics, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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Fady Hannah-Shmouni Section on Endocrinology and Genetics, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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Summary

Succinate dehydrogenase deficiency has been associated with several neoplasias, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and those associated with hereditary paraganglioma (PGL)/ pheochromocytoma (PHEO) syndromes, Carney dyad, and Carney triad. Carney triad is a rare multitumoral syndrome characterized by co-existing PGL, gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), and pulmonary chondroma (CHO). We report a case of a 57-year-old male who presented with para-aortic and gastroesophogeal masses, and a right renal superior pole lesion, which were classified as multiple PGLs, a GIST, and a clear cell renal carcinoma, respectively, on pathology following surgical resection. Additionally, a CHO was diagnosed radiologically, although no biopsy was performed. A diagnosis of Carney triad was made. SDHB immunohistochemical staining was negative for the PGL and the GIST, indicating SDH-deficiency. Interestingly, the renal cell carcinoma (RCC) stained positive for both SDHB and SDHA. Subsequent genetic screening of SDH subunit genes revealed a germline inactivating heterozygous SDHA pathogenic variant (c.91 C>T, p.R31X). Loss of heterozygosity was not detected at the tumor level for the RCC, which likely indicated the SDHA variant would not be causative of the RCC, but could still predispose to the development of neoplasias. To the knowledge of the authors this is the first reported case of an SDHA pathogenic variant in a patient with Carney triad complicated by RCC.

Learning points

  • The succinate dehydrogenase enzyme is encoded by four subunit genes (SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD; collectively referred to as SDHx), which have been implicated in several neoplasias and are classified as tumor suppressor genes.

  • Carney triad is a rare multiple-neoplasia syndrome presenting as an association of PGLs, GISTs, and CHOs.

  • Carney triad is most commonly associated with hypermethylation of SDHC as demonstrated in tumor tissue, but approximately 10% of cases are due to pathogenic SDHx variants.

  • Although SDHB pathogenic variants are most commonly reported in SDH-deficient renal cell carcinoma, SDHA disease-causing variants have been reported in rare cases.

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Ana M Lopes Endocrinology Department, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário do Porto, EPE, Porto, Portugal

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Sofia Teixeira Endocrinology Department, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário do Porto, EPE, Porto, Portugal

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Summary

Molecular alterations of the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 1B (HNF1B) are associated with systemic disease, with kidney disease and maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) as the most characteristic manifestations. Other features comprise pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, liver and biliary anomalies, and genital tract malformations. HNF1B-associated disease is clinically heterogeneous, and therefore the diagnosis is challenging. The authors describe the case of a 19-year-old man with new-onset diabetes after kidney transplantation (NODAT). The kidney disease presented during fetal life as bilateral hyperechogenic kidneys. Renal function progressively deteriorated during childhood, and at the age of 19, the patient was submitted to a living-kidney transplant. Two weeks after transplant, NODAT developed. Given the young age and normal body weight, NODAT was unexpected, and the possibility of HNF1B-associated disease was considered. Screening for mutations in HNF1B was undertaken, and a known mutation was found. As this case highlights, HNF1B-associated disease should be considered when NODAT unexpectedly develops in young kidney transplant recipients with a suggestive renal disease.

Learning points:

  • HNF1B anomalies are associated with systemic disease, including kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, liver test abnormalities and genital tract malformations.

  • Phenotype is variable and there are no pathognomonic manifestations, but kidney disease appears to be the most common feature and diabetes the most frequent extra-renal phenotype.

  • Spontaneous gene alterations are common, and the lack of family history should not exclude the diagnosis.

  • HNF1B defects should be considered when NODAT develops in a young adult kidney transplant recipient with a suggestive kidney disease and without extensive risk factors for diabetes.

  • The most appropriate treatment for HNF1B-associated diabetes is not established, but immunosuppressive therapy superimposed on a beta-cell dysfunction seems to determine the need for insulin therapy after a variable period.

  • Immunosupressive regimens free of calcineurin inhibitors should be considered in patients with HNF1B-associated disease to minimize the risk of developing NODAT.

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Ravikumar Ravindran Section of Endocrinology, YYF Hospital, Ystrad Fawr Way, Caerphilly, UK

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Justyna Witczak Section of Endocrinology, YYF Hospital, Ystrad Fawr Way, Caerphilly, UK

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Suhani Bahl Section of Endocrinology, YYF Hospital, Ystrad Fawr Way, Caerphilly, UK

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Lakdasa D K E Premawardhana Section of Endocrinology, YYF Hospital, Ystrad Fawr Way, Caerphilly, UK
Centre for Endocrine and Diabetes Sciences, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK

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Mohamed Adlan Section of Endocrinology, YYF Hospital, Ystrad Fawr Way, Caerphilly, UK

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Summary

A 53-year-old man who used growth hormone (GH), anabolic steroids and testosterone (T) for over 20 years presented with severe constipation and hypercalcaemia. He had benign prostatic hyperplasia and renal stones but no significant family history. Investigations showed – (1) corrected calcium (reference range) 3.66 mmol/L (2.2–2.6), phosphate 1.39 mmol/L (0.80–1.50), and PTH 2 pmol/L (1.6–7.2); (2) urea 21.9 mmol/L (2.5–7.8), creatinine 319 mmol/L (58–110), eGFR 18 mL/min (>90), and urine analysis (protein 4+, glucose 4+, red cells 2+); (3) creatine kinase 7952 U/L (40–320), positive anti Jo-1, and Ro-52 antibodies; (4) vitamin D 46 nmol/L (30–50), vitamin D3 29 pmol/L (55–139), vitamin A 4.65 mmol/L (1.10–2.60), and normal protein electrophoresis; (5) normal CT thorax, abdomen and pelvis and MRI of muscles showed ‘inflammation’, myositis and calcification; (6) biopsy of thigh muscles showed active myositis, chronic myopathic changes and mineral deposition and of the kidneys showed positive CD3 and CD45, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and hypercalcaemic tubular changes; and (7) echocardiography showed left ventricular hypertrophy (likely medications and myositis contributing), aortic stenosis and an ejection fraction of 44%, and MRI confirmed these with possible right coronary artery disease. Hypercalcaemia was possibly multifactorial – (1) calcium release following myositis, rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury; (2) possible primary hyperparathyroidism (a low but detectable PTH); and (3) hypervitaminosis A. He was hydrated and given pamidronate, mycophenolate and prednisolone. Following initial biochemical and clinical improvement, he had multiple subsequent admissions for hypercalcaemia and renal deterioration. He continued taking GH and T despite counselling but died suddenly of a myocardial infarction.

Learning points:

  • The differential diagnosis of hypercalcaemia is sometimes a challenge.

  • Diagnosis may require multidisciplinary expertise and multiple and invasive investigations.

  • There may be several disparate causes for hypercalcaemia, although one usually predominates.

  • Maintaining ‘body image’ even with the use of harmful drugs may be an overpowering emotion despite counselling about their dangers.

Open access