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Open access

Su Ann Tee, Earn Hui Gan, Mohamad Zaher Kanaan, David Ashley Price, Tim Hoare and Simon H S Pearce

Summary

Primary adrenal insufficiency secondary to syphilis is extremely rare, with only five cases being reported in the literature. We report a case of adrenal insufficiency as a manifestation of Treponema pallidum infection (tertiary syphilis). A 69-year-old, previously fit and well Caucasian male was found to have adrenal insufficiency after being admitted with weight loss, anorexia and postural dizziness resulting in a fall. Biochemical testing showed hyponatraemia, hyperkalaemia, and an inadequate response to Synacthen testing, with a peak cortisol level of 302 nmol/L after administration of 250 µg Synacthen. Abdominal imaging revealed bilateral adrenal hyperplasia with inguinal and retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy. He was started on hydrocortisone replacement; however, it was not until he re-attended ophthalmology with a red eye and visual loss 1 month later, that further work-up revealed the diagnosis of tertiary syphilis. Following a course of penicillin, repeat imaging 5 months later showed resolution of the abnormal radiological appearances. However, adrenal function has not recovered and 3 years following initial presentation, the patient remains on both glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement. In conclusion, this case highlights the importance of considering syphilis as a potential differential diagnosis in patients presenting with adrenal insufficiency and bilateral adrenal masses, given the recent re-emergence of this condition. The relative ease of treating infectious causes of adrenal lesions makes accurate and timely diagnosis crucial.

Learning points:

  • Infectious causes, including syphilis, should be excluded before considering adrenalectomy or biopsy for any patient presenting with an adrenal mass.

  • It is important to perform a full infection screen including tests for human immunodeficiency virus, other blood-borne viruses and concurrent sexually transmitted diseases in patients presenting with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia with primary adrenal insufficiency.

  • Awareness of syphilis as a potential differential diagnosis is important, as it not only has a wide range of clinical presentations, but its prevalence has been increasing in recent times.

Open access

Rayna Patel, Waheed Mustafa, Michael T Sheaff and Sami Khan

Summary

IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a rare but increasingly recognised condition, emerging as a clinical entity following the observation of the associations of autoimmune pancreatitis. IgG4-RD is characterised by extensive infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells into multiple organs and raised serum IgG4 levels. Clinical manifestations of IgG4 disease classically include autoimmune pancreatitis, lacrimal or salivary gland infiltration (formerly known as Mikulicz disease) and retroperitoneal fibrosis. More rarely, IgG4 disease can cause pituitary hypophysitis. Although most frequently described in middle-aged males, the epidemiology and pathogenesis of the disease remain largely undefined. Nevertheless, an understanding of the wide variety of clinical manifestations of this multi-system condition is undeniably important given the often excellent outcomes following treatment. We describe an unusual presentation of IgG4 disease with isolated diabetes insipidus secondary to pituitary hypophysitis. The patient in question subsequently developed chest pain secondary to mediastinal lymphadenopathy and tubulo-interstitial nephritis leading to renal dysfunction. He was successfully treated with oral steroids and had regular follow-up, and remains well at follow-up 2 years later.

Learning points

  • IgG4 disease, although rare, is increasing in prevalence largely due to increased recognition of its clinical manifestations, including autoimmune pancreatitis, lacrimal or salivary gland infiltration, retroperitoneal fibrosis and, more rarely, lymphocytic hypophysitis presenting as diabetes insipidus.

  • IgG4 disease is highly treatable, and symptoms may show complete resolution with administration of steroids, highlighting the importance of correct and timely diagnosis.

  • Causes of lymphocytic hypophysitis are varied and not distinguishable radiologically. Given the difficulty in biopsying the pituitary, careful attention must be paid to the systemic clinical presentation to provide clues as to the underlying disorder.

Open access

Hiroto Minamino, Hidefumi Inaba, Hiroyuki Ariyasu, Hiroto Furuta, Masahiro Nishi, Takashi Yoshimasu, Akinori Nishikawa, Masanori Nakanishi, Shigeki Tsuchihashi, Fumiyoshi Kojima, Shin-ichi Murata, Gen Inoue and Takashi Akamizu

Summary

A 73-year-old man with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) suffered from purpura on the lower legs. He was diagnosed with IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) with serum IgG4 elevation and dacryo-sialadenitis confirmed histologically. Serum Th2 and Treg cytokines, interleukin 7 (IL7), IL8 and Th2 chemokine levels were elevated, while skewed Th1 balance was seen in fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Therefore, preferential Th1 balance in HT appeared to be followed by IgG4-RD characterized with Th2 and Treg polarization. The commencement of steroid therapy dramatically exacerbated clinical manifestations including IgG4-RD-associated HT. The measurement of cytokine and chemokine levels as well as FACS analysis in the development of IgG4-RD seemed to be beneficial. In conclusion, an innovative association of HT, IgG4-RD and vasculitis was observed. This report also offers novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for IgG4-RD.

Learning points

  • Recently, a subtype of HT has been considered to be a thyroid manifestation of IgG4-RD, although the etiology of IgG4-RD is not established yet.

  • Immunologically a close association between HT and vasculitis was reported.

  • Leukocytoclastic vasculitis is a rare skin presentation of IgG4-RD.

  • In the current case, during the course of HT, IgG4-RD and leukocytoclastic vasculitis occurred; thus, innate immunity and acquired immunity seem to be involved in the development of IgG4-RD.

  • The measurement of cytokine and chemokines appeared to be beneficial in the development of IgG4-RD.

  • Remarkably, effectiveness of steroid therapy for HT suggested presence of IgG4-RD-associated HT. Therefore, this report highlights the pathogenesis of IgG4-RD and proposes novel therapeutic mechanisms. Clinicians should pay attention to the development of IgG4-RD and vasculitis during long course of HT.

Open access

Lauren J Baker, Anthony J Gill, Charles Chan, Betty P C Lin and Bronwyn A Crawford

Summary

In 2006, a 58-year-old woman presented with thyrotoxicosis. She had undergone left hemithyroidectomy 14 years before for a benign follicular adenoma. Ultrasound imaging demonstrated bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy with enhanced tracer uptake in the left lateral neck on a Technetium-99m uptake scan. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of a left lateral neck node was insufficient for a cytological diagnosis; however, thyroglobulin (Tg) washings were strongly positive. The clinical suspicion was of functionally active metastatic thyroid cancer in cervical lymph nodes. A completion thyroidectomy and bilateral cervical lymph node dissection were performed. Histology demonstrated benign multinodularity in the right hemithyroid, with bilateral reactive lymphadenopathy and 24 benign hyperplastic thyroid nodules in the left lateral neck that were classified as parasitic thyroid nodules. As there had been a clinical suspicion of thyroid cancer, and the hyperplastic/parasitic thyroid tissue in the neck was extensive, the patient was given ablative radioactive iodine (3.7 GBq). After 2 years, a diagnostic radioactive iodine scan was clear and the serum Tg was undetectable. The patient has now been followed for 7 years with no evidence of recurrence. Archived tissue from a left lateral neck thyroid nodule has recently been analysed for BRAF V600E mutation, which was negative.

Learning points

  • Thyrotoxicosis due to functional thyroid tissue in the lateral neck is very rare and may be due to metastatic thyroid cancer or benign parasitic thyroid tissue.

  • Parasitic thyroid nodules should be considered as a differential diagnosis of lateral neck thyroid deposits, particularly where there is a history of prior thyroid surgery.

  • Parasitic thyroid nodules may occur as a result of traumatic rupture or implantation from a follicular adenoma at the time of surgery.

  • The use of ablative radioactive iodine may be appropriate, as resection of all parasitic thyroid tissue can prove difficult.

  • BRAF mutational analysis of parasitic thyroid tissue may provide extra reassurance in the exclusion of papillary thyroid carcinoma.