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Rishi Raj Pikeville Medical Center, Pikeville, Kentucky, USA

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Samaneh Hasanzadeh Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, Iran

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Mitra Dashtizadeh Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, Iran

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Mohammadreza Kalantarhormozi Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, Iran

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Katayoun Vahdat Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, Iran

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Mohammad Hossein Dabbaghmanesh Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

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Iraj Nabipour Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, Iran

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Mohammdreza Ravanbod Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

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Majid Assadi Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, Iran

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Basir Hashemi Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

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Kamyar Asadipooya University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA

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Summary

Oncogenic osteomalacia secondary to glomus tumor is extremely rare. Localization of causative tumors is critical as surgical resection can lead to a complete biochemical and clinical cure. We present a case of oncogenic osteomalacia treated with resection of glomus tumor. A 39-year-old woman with a history of chronic sinusitis presented with chronic body ache and muscle weakness. Biochemical evaluation revealed elevated alkaline phosphatase hypophosphatemia, increased urinary phosphate excretion, low calcitriol, and FGF23 was unsuppressed suggestive of oncogenic osteomalacia. Diagnostic studies showed increase uptake in multiple bones. Localization with MRI of paranasal sinuses revealed a sinonasal mass with concurrent uptake in the same area on the octreotide scan. Surgical resection of the sinonasal mass was consistent with the glomus tumor. The patient improved both clinically and biochemically postoperatively. Along with the case of oncogenic osteomalacia secondary to a glomus tumor, we have also discussed in detail the recent development in the diagnosis and management of oncogenic osteomalacia.

Learning points

  • Tumor-induced osteomalacia is a rare cause of osteomalacia caused by the secretion of FGF23 from mesenchymal tumors.

  • Mesenchymal tumors causing TIO are often difficult to localize and treat.

  • Resection of the tumor can result in complete resolution of biochemical and clinical manifestations in a very short span of time.

  • Glomus tumor can lead to tumor induced osteomalacia and should be surgically treated.

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Nami Mohammadian Khonsari Research Committee, School of Medicine, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran

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Benyamin Hakak-Zargar Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada

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Tessa Voth Department of Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology, Faculty of Science, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada

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Shahab Noorian Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran

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Summary

Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is a lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) that results in the accumulation of sulfate esters which go on to cause neurological deterioration and mental delay, skin changes, and dysmorphism. The disease can be categorized into three subtypes based on the age of onset: neonatal, late infantile, or juvenile. Our patient is a 2.5-year-old girl, the only child of a healthy couple. Prior to the presentation of the disease, she had not been noted to have any previous health complications. The condition began at the age of 6 months with developmental regression and global hypotonia. Following thorough evaluation and testing, the patient was diagnosed with severe late infantile MSD, although some features, such as minimal mental deterioration, minimal dysmorphic facial features, and minimal organ enlargement, did not fully correlate with the diagnosis, since in cases of severe forms of the condition these features are almost always quite marked. The unexpected minimalism of some of the patient’s MSD signs in spite of the severity of her MSD condition made her case worth further studying.

Learning points:

  • Treating dermatologic signs and symptoms greatly eased our patient’s discomfort.

  • We would suggest the use of appropriate supportive treatment for symptom management regardless of the life expectancy of the patient.

  • As regards the diagnosis of MLD, given that in some cases the patient may present with irregular features of the condition, a genetic evaluation may be useful for accurate diagnosis.

  • If motor function impairment is followed by dermatologic involvement, as seen in our patient and in many cases in the literature, MSD must be considered, and additional tests should be done to rule it out.

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Alireza Arefzadeh Endocrinology Department, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

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Pooyan Khalighinejad School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

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Bahar Ataeinia School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

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Pegah Parvar School of Medicine, Islamic Azad University Medical Branch of Tehran, Tehran, Iran

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Summary

Deletion of chromosome 2q37 results in a rare congenital syndrome known as brachydactyly mental retardation (BDMR) syndrome; a syndrome which has phenotypes similar to Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) syndrome. In this report, we describe a patient with AHO due to microdeletion in long arm of chromosome 2 [del(2)(q37.3)] who had growth hormone (GH) deficiency, which is a unique feature among reported BDMR cases. This case was presented with shortening of the fourth and fifth metacarpals which along with AHO phenotype, brings pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP) and pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHP-Ia) to mind; however, a genetic study revealed del(2)(q37.3). We recommend clinicians to take BDMR in consideration when they are faced with the features of AHO; although this syndrome is a rare disease, it should be ruled out while diagnosing PPHP or PHP-Ia. Moreover, we recommend evaluation of IGF 1 level and GH stimulation test in patients with BDMR whose height is below the 3rd percentile.

Learning points:

  • Clinicians must have brachydactyly mental retardation (BDMR) syndrome in consideration when they are faced with the features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy.

  • Although BDMR syndrome is a rare disease, it should be ruled out while diagnosing PPHP or PHP-Ia.

  • Evaluation of IGF1 level in patients diagnosed with BDMR whose height is below the 3rd percentile is important.

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Maryam Heidarpour Isfahan University of Medical Sciences Isfahan Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center Ringgold Standard Institution, Isfahan, Iran

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Mehdi Karami Isfahan University of Medical Sciences Isfahan Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center Ringgold Standard Institution, Isfahan, Iran

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Pegah Hedayat Isfahan University of Medical Sciences Isfahan Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center Ringgold Standard Institution, Isfahan, Iran

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Ashraf Aminorroaya Isfahan University of Medical Sciences Isfahan Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center Ringgold Standard Institution, Isfahan, Iran

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Summary

Primary hyperparathyroidism revealed by thoracic spine brown tumor and peptic ulcer bleeding is rare. We presented a case of 33-year-old male patient who was admitted with paraplegia. Thoracic spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed extradural lesion at T4 level. He underwent surgical decompression in T4. According to histopathologic finding and elevated serum parathormone (PTH) and hypercalcemia (total serum calcium 12.1 mg/dL), the diagnosis of brown tumor was down. Ultrasonography of his neck showed a well-defined lesion of 26 × 14 × 6 mm. The day after surgery, he experienced 2 episodes of melena. Bedside upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed gastric peptic ulcer with visible vessel. Treatment with intragastric local instillation of epinephrine and argon plasma coagulation was done to stop bleeding. After stabilization of the patient, parathyroidectomy was performed. Histologic study showed the parathyroid adenoma without any manifestation of malignancy. At discharge, serum calcium was normal (8.6 mg/dL). On 40th day of discharge, standing and walking status was normal.

Learning points:

  • Thoracic spine involvement is a very rare presentation of primary hyperparathyroidism.

  • The issue of whether primary hyperparathyroidism increases the risk of peptic ulcer disease remains controversial. However, gastrointestinal involvement has been reported in association with classic severe primary hyperparathyroidism.

  • The treatment of brown tumor varies from case to case.

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Roghieh Molaei Langroudi Diagnostic Radiology Department, Poursina Hospital, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Guilan, Iran

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Fatemeh Ghazanfari Amlashi Guilan Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Razi Hospital, Rasht, Guilan, Iran and

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Mohammad Hassan Hedayati Emami Department of Endocrinology, Guilan Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Razi Hospital, Rasht, Guilan, Iran

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Summary

Background: Spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (sOHSS) can occur following hypothyroidism. Ultrasonography facilitates diagnosis and monitoring of this syndrome. We describe ovarian sonographic changes in a hypothyroid patient with sOHSS after treatment with levothyroxine (l-T4).

Case presentation: A 15-year-old girl presented with abdominal pain and distension for a few months. On examination, she had classical features of hypothyroidism. Abdominal and pelvic ultrasound revealed enlarged ovaries with multiple thin-walled cysts and mild ascitic fluid. On follow-up, abdominal ultrasound showed significant reduction of ovary size after 6 weeks of initiation of l-T4. Normal ovary size with complete regression of ovarian cysts was seen after 4 months.

Conclusion: Serial ultrasound in sOHSS associated with hypothyroidism showed regression of ovarian cysts and ovarian volume after 4 months whereas in other studies, it is reported to happen in various durations, presumably according to its etiology.

Learning points

  • OHSS can rarely occur due to hypothyroidism.

  • This type of OHSS can be simply treated by l-T4 replacement, rather than conservative management or surgery in severe cases.

  • Ultrasound follow-up shows significant regression of ovarian size and cysts within 6 weeks of initiation of l-T4.

  • Ultrasound follow-up shows normal ovarian size with complete resolution of ovarian cysts 4 months after treatment.

Open access