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Open access

Carine Ghassan Richa, Khadija Jamal Saad, Ali Khaled Chaaban and Mohamad Souheil El Rawas

Summary

The objective of the study is to report a case of acute pancreatitis secondary to hypercalcemia induced by primary hyperparathyroidism in a pregnant woman at the end of the first trimester. The case included a 32-year-old woman who was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis and severe hypercalcemia refractory to many regimens of medical therapy in the first trimester of pregnancy. She was successfully treated with parathyroidectomy in the early second trimester with complete resolution of hypercalcemia and pancreatitis. Neonatal course was unremarkable. To our best knowledge, this is a rare case when primary hyperparathyroidism and its complications are diagnosed in the first trimester of pregnancy. In conclusion, primary hyperparathyroidism is a rare life-threatening condition to the fetus and mother especially when associated with complications such as pancreatitis. Early therapeutic intervention is important to reduce the morbidity and mortality. Parathyroidectomy performed in the second trimester can be the only solution.

Learning points:

  • Learning how to make diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism in a woman during the first trimester of pregnancy.

  • Understanding the complications of hypercalcemia and be aware of the high mortality and sequelae in both fetus and mother.

  • Providing the adequate treatment in such complicated cases with coordinated care between endocrinologists and obstetricians to ensure optimal outcomes.

Open access

Carine Ghassan Richa, Khadija Jamal Saad, Georges Habib Halabi, Elie Mekhael Gharios, Fadi Louis Nasr and Marie Tanios Merheb

Summary

The objective of this study is to report three cases of paraneoplastic or ectopic Cushing syndrome, which is a rare phenomenon of the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent Cushing syndrome. Three cases are reported in respect of clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment in addition to relevant literature review. The results showed that ectopic ACTH secretion can be associated with different types of neoplasm most common of which are bronchial carcinoid tumors, which are slow-growing, well-differentiated neoplasms with a favorable prognosis and small-cell lung cancer, which are poorly differentiated tumors with a poor outcome. The latter is present in two out of three cases and in the remaining one, primary tumor could not be localized, representing a small fraction of patients with paraneoplastic Cushing. Diagnosis is established in the setting of high clinical suspicion by documenting an elevated cortisol level, ACTH and doing dexamethasone suppression test. Treatment options include management of the primary tumor by surgery and chemotherapy and treating Cushing syndrome. Prognosis is poor in SCLC. We concluded that in front of a high clinical suspicion, ectopic Cushing syndrome diagnosis should be considered, and identification of the primary tumor is essential.

Learning points:

  • Learning how to suspect ectopic Cushing syndrome and confirm it among all the causes of excess cortisol.

  • Distinguish between occult and severe ectopic Cushing syndrome and etiology.

  • Providing the adequate treatment of the primary tumor as well as for the cortisol excess.

  • Prognosis depends on the differentiation and type of the primary malignancy.

Open access

R Bou Khalil, M Abou Salbi, S Sissi, N El Kara, E Azar, M Khoury, G Abdallah, J Hreiki and S Farhat

Summary

Methimazole is an anti-thyroid drug commonly used to treat hyperthyroidism and is a relatively safe medication. Several side effects have been reported and usually develop within 3 months of therapy. Well-known adverse reactions include agranulocytosis, hepatitis, skin eruptions, and musculoskeletal complaints such as myalgia, arthralgia, and arthritis. So far, myositis secondary to carbimazole was described in the context of a lupus-like syndrome or other rare cases of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-associated vasculitis. Methimazole-induced myositis occurring independently of such reactions was rarely stated. We report a patient with hyperthyroidism who, early after therapy with methimazole, developed hepatitis, eosinophilia, and fever that resolved completely after stopping the medication as well as a delayed onset of biopsy-proven eosinophilic myositis and fasciitis of gluteal muscles that resolved eventually without any additional therapy. Therefore, we raise the awareness regarding a rare side effect of methimazole: myositis.

Learning points

  • Several differential diagnoses arise when managing a hyperthyroid patient with muscle complaints.

  • Both hyperthyroidism and methimazole are associated with myositis.

  • Methimazole-induced myositis is a rare clinical entity.

  • Resolution of symptoms may occur after stopping methimazole.