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Open access

Carlos Tavares Bello, Emma van der Poest Clement and Richard Feelders

Summary

Cushing’s syndrome is a rare disease that results from prolonged exposure to supraphysiological levels of glucocorticoids. Severe and rapidly progressive cases are often, but not exclusively, attributable to ectopic ACTH secretion. Extreme hypercortisolism usually has florid metabolic consequences and is associated with an increased infectious and thrombotic risk. The authors report on a case of a 51-year-old male that presented with severe Cushing’s syndrome secondary to an ACTH-secreting pituitary macroadenoma, whose diagnostic workup was affected by concurrent subclinical multifocal pulmonary infectious nodules. The case is noteworthy for the atypically severe presentation of Cushing’s disease, and it should remind the clinician of the possible infectious and thrombotic complications associated with Cushing’s syndrome.

Learning points:

  • Severe Cushing’s syndrome is not always caused by ectopic ACTH secretion.
  • Hypercortisolism is a state of immunosuppression, being associated with an increased risk for opportunistic infections.
  • Infectious pulmonary infiltrates may lead to imaging diagnostic dilemmas when investigating a suspected ectopic ACTH secretion.
  • Cushing’s syndrome carries an increased thromboembolic risk that may even persist after successful surgical management.
  • Antibiotic and venous thromboembolism prophylaxis should be considered in every patient with severe Cushing’s syndrome.
Open access

Takatoshi Anno, Fumiko Kawasaki, Maiko Takai, Ryo Shigemoto, Yuki Kan, Hideaki Kaneto, Tomoatsu Mune, Kohei Kaku and Niro Okimoto

Summary

A 76-year-old man had a hypopituitarism including adrenal insufficiency, hypogonadism and hypothyroidism. Based on various findings including the swelling of the pituitary gland, increase of serum IgG4 level and abundant IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in immunostaining of the pituitary gland, we diagnosed this subject as IgG4-related hypophysitis. In general, a high-dose glucocorticoid treatment is effective for IgG4-related disease. His clinical symptom, laboratory data and adrenal insufficiency were almost improved without any therapy. The serum IgG4 level was decreased and pituitary size was normalized with hydrocortisone as physiological replacement. This case report provides the possibility that IgG4 level is decreased spontaneously or with physiological dose of glucocorticoid therapy.

Learning points:

  • We performed the pituitary gland biopsy and histochemical examination glucocorticoid therapy in a subject with IgG4-related hypophysitis.
  • This case report provides the possibility that IgG4 level is decreased spontaneously or with a physiological dose of glucocorticoid therapy. We reported the clinical course of IgG4-related hypophysitis without a high-dose glucocorticoid treatment, although there were a few reports about the retrospective examination.
  • Although the patient had still higher IgG4 level compared to normal range, his clinical symptom disappeared and his laboratory data were improved.
  • We should keep in mind the possibility of IgG4-related hypophysitis when we examine one of the uncertain causes of a hypopituitarism including adrenal insufficiency, hypogonadism and hypothyroidism.
Open access

Rémi Goupil, Martin Wolley, Jacobus Ungerer, Brett McWhinney, Kuniaki Mukai, Mitsuhide Naruse, Richard D Gordon and Michael Stowasser

Summary

In patients with primary aldosteronism (PA) undergoing adrenal venous sampling (AVS), cortisol levels are measured to assess lateralization of aldosterone overproduction. Concomitant adrenal autonomous cortisol and aldosterone secretion therefore have the potential to confound AVS results. We describe a case where metanephrine was measured during AVS to successfully circumvent this problem. A 55-year-old hypertensive male had raised plasma aldosterone/renin ratios and PA confirmed by fludrocortisone suppression testing. Failure of plasma cortisol to suppress overnight following dexamethasone and persistently suppressed corticotrophin were consistent with adrenal hypercortisolism. On AVS, comparison of adrenal and peripheral A/F ratios (left 5.7 vs peripheral 1.0; right 1.7 vs peripheral 1.1) suggested bilateral aldosterone production, with the left gland dominant but without contralateral suppression. However, using aldosterone/metanephrine ratios (left 9.7 vs peripheral 2.4; right 1.3 vs peripheral 2.5), aldosterone production lateralized to the left with good contralateral suppression. The patient underwent left laparoscopic adrenalectomy with peri-operative glucocorticoid supplementation to prevent adrenal insufficiency. Pathological examination revealed adrenal cortical adenomas producing both cortisol and aldosterone within a background of aldosterone-producing cell clusters. Hypertension improved and cured of PA and hypercortisolism were confirmed by negative post-operative fludrocortisone suppression and overnight 1 mg dexamethasone suppression testing. Routine dexamethasone suppression testing in patients with PA permits detection of concurrent hypercortisolism which can confound AVS results and cause unilateral PA to be misdiagnosed as bilateral with patients thereby denied potentially curative surgical treatment. In such patients, measurement of plasma metanephrine during AVS may overcome this issue.

Learning points

  • Simultaneous autonomous overproduction of cortisol and aldosterone is increasingly recognised although still apparently uncommon.
  • Because cortisol levels are used during AVS to correct for differences in dilution of adrenal with non-adrenal venous blood when assessing for lateralisation, unilateral cortisol overproduction with contralateral suppression could confound the interpretation of AVS results
  • Measuring plasma metanephrine during AVS to calculate lateralisation ratios may circumvent this problem.

Open access

Satoru Sakihara, Kazunori Kageyama, Satoshi Yamagata, Ken Terui, Makoto Daimon and Toshihiro Suda

Summary

ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome includes Cushing's disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome (EAS). The differential diagnosis of Cushing's disease from EAS in cases of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome is a challenging problem. We report here a case of EAS with an unknown source of ACTH secretion. Extensive imaging procedures, involving computed tomography (neck to pelvis), pituitary magnetic resonance imaging, and whole-body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography, failed to reveal the source of ACTH secretion. Intermittent administration of bromocriptine, a short-acting and nonselective dopamine agonist, has afforded adequate suppression of plasma ACTH and cortisol levels over the long term.

Learning points

  • Tumor excision is the primary treatment for EAS. However, when surgery is impossible, medical therapy is needed to treat hypercortisolism.
  • In cases where the source of ACTH secretion is unknown, inhibitors of steroidogenesis, such as metyrapone, mitotane, ketoconazole, and etomidate, are mostly used to suppress cortisol secretion.
  • Medications that suppress ACTH secretion are less effective, therefore less popular, as standard treatments.
  • In the present case, short-term treatment with dopamine agonists was effective for the long-term suppression of both ACTH and cortisol levels.