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Open access

Yael Lefkovits and Amanda Adler

Summary

Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum (NLD) is a chronic granulomatous dermatitis generally involving the anterior aspect of the shin, that arises in 0.3–1.2% of patients with diabetes mellitus (1). The lesions are often yellow or brown with telangiectatic plaque, a central area of atrophy and raised violaceous borders (2). Similar to other conditions with a high risk of scarring including burns, stasis ulcers and lupus vulgaris, NLD provides a favourable environment for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) formation (3). A number of cases of SCC from NLD have been recorded (3, 4, 5); however, our search of the literature failed to identify any cases of either metastatic or fatal SCC which developed within an area of NLD. This article describes a patient with established type 1 diabetes mellitus who died from SCC which developed from an area of NLD present for over 10 years. Currently, there are a paucity of recommendations in the medical literature for screening people with NLD for the early diagnosis of SCC. We believe that clinicians should regard non-healing ulcers in the setting of NLD with a high index of clinical suspicion for SCC, and an early biopsy of such lesions should be recommended.

Learning points:

  • Non-healing, recalcitrant ulcers arising from necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, which fail to heal by conservative measures, should be regarded with a high index of clinical suspicion for malignancy.
  • If squamous cell carcinoma is suspected, a biopsy should be performed as soon as possible to prevent metastatic spread, amputation or even death.
  • Our literature search failed to reveal specific recommendations for screening and follow-up of non-healing recalcitrant ulcers in the setting of necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum.
  • Further research is required in this field.
Open access

Chad Bisambar, Andrew Collier, Fraser Duthie and Carron Meney

Summary

A 40-year-old Caucasian female presented with hyperglycaemia, polyuria, polydipsia and weight loss of 6 kg over a 1-month period. There was no personal or family history of malignancy or diabetes mellitus. On examination, she was jaundiced with pale mucous membranes and capillary glucose was 23.1 mmol/L. Initial investigations showed iron deficiency anaemia and obstructive pattern of liver function tests. HbA1c was diagnostic of diabetes mellitus at 79 mmol/mol. Malignancy was suspected and CT chest, abdomen and pelvis showed significant dilatation of intra- and extra-hepatic biliary tree including pancreatic duct, with periampullary 30 mm mass lesion projecting into lumen of duodenum. Enlarged nodes were seen around the superior mesenteric artery. This was confirmed on MRI liver. Fasting gut hormones were normal except for a mildly elevated somatostatin level. Chromogranin A was elevated at 78 pmol/L with normal chromogranin B. Duodenoscopy and biopsy showed possible tubovillous adenoma with low-grade dysplasia, but subsequent endoscopic ultrasound and biopsy revealed a grade 1, well differentiated neuroendocrine tumour. The patient was started on insulin, transfused to Hb >8 g/dL and Whipple’s pancreatico-duodenectomy was undertaken. This showed a well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma arising in duodenum (Grade G1 with Ki67: 0.5%), with areas of chronic pancreatitis and preservation of pancreatic islet cells. There was complete resolution of diabetes post Whipple’s procedure and patient was able to come of insulin treatment. Her last HBA1C was 31 mmol/mol, 4 months post tumour resection.

Learning points:

  • Diabetes mellitus and malignancy can be related.
  • A high index of suspicion is needed when diabetes mellitus presents atypically.
  • Non-functional neuroendocrine tumours can present with diabetes mellitus.
Open access

Melissa Katz, Simon Smith, Luke Conway and Ashim Sinha

Summary

Diabetes mellitus is a well-recognised risk factor for melioidosis, the disease caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, which is endemic in northern Australia and Southeast Asia. We present the initial diagnostic dilemma of a febrile patient from northern Australia with type 1 diabetes mellitus and negative blood cultures. After a 6-week history of fevers and undifferentiated abdominal pain, MRI of her spine revealed a psoas abscess. She underwent drainage of the abscess which cultured B. pseudomallei. She completed 6 weeks of intravenous (IV) ceftazidime and oral trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) followed by a 12-week course of oral TMP/SMX. We postulate that the likely route of infection was inoculation via her skin, the integrity of which was compromised from her insulin pump insertion sites and an underlying dermatological condition.

Learning points:

  • Diabetes mellitus is the strongest risk factor for developing melioidosis.
  • Atypical infections need to be considered in individuals with diabetes mellitus who are febrile, even if blood cultures are negative.
  • There is heterogeneity in the clinical presentation of melioidosis due to variable organ involvement.
  • Consider melioidosis in febrile patients who have travelled to northern Australia, Asia and other endemic areas.