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Nele Van Roy Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Vitaz, Sint-Niklaas, Belgium

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Sylvester Heerwegh Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Vitaz, Sint-Niklaas, Belgium

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Dashty Husein Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Vitaz, Sint-Niklaas, Belgium

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Joke Ruys Department of Ophthalmology, Vitaz, Sint-Niklaas, Belgium

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Peter Coremans Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Vitaz, Sint-Niklaas, Belgium

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Summary

Bardet–Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a rare, autosomal recessive, multisystem non-motile ciliopathy of progressive onset. It is primarily characterised by rod–cone dystrophy, early-onset obesity and related complications, postaxial polydactyly, renal and genitourinary abnormalities, learning disabilities, and hypogonadism. The diagnosis is based on Beales’ modified diagnostic criteria. We present a case of two monozygotic female twins, 17 years of age at presentation, referred for obesity since childhood. The initial hormonal work-up was negative and no dysmorphic features were noted. They were diagnosed with exogenous obesity. However, after ophthalmologic problems became apparent, rod–cone dystrophy was observed and genetic testing was performed. A mutation in the BBS2 gene led to the diagnosis of BBS, although the full diagnostic criteria were not met. This case not only highlights the need to raise awareness for BBS but also exposes two limitations of the current diagnostic standard. The first limitation is the low sensitivity of the clinical diagnostic model, due to the progressive onset and the high variability of the syndrome. The second limitation is the unclear role of genetic testing. As genetic testing becomes more widely available, genetic diagnosis preceding clinical diagnosis will become more common, leading to a diagnostic conundrum. We propose an update of the diagnostic model. A less strict application in the presence of confirmed genetic mutations should be applied, as this could facilitate earlier diagnosis and intervention. This is important because therapeutic agents are being developed that could have a significant impact on quality of life and prognosis.

Learning points

  • Due to the low prevalence, the significant inter-and intrafamilial variation, and the slowly evolving phenotype, monogenic forms of obesity such as Bardet–Biedl syndrome are difficult to diagnose. Despite advances in the understanding of the presentation, pathophysiology and access to accurate genetic characterisation, a substantial number of diagnoses are still made by ophthalmology, as recognition of BBS in other departments of medicine, remains limited.

  • Clinical diagnosis of BBS is based on Beales’ modified diagnostic criteria which require the presence of four primary features or three primary features plus two secondary features. This model has its limitations. Due to the progressive onset of clinical symptoms, patients generally do not meet the diagnostic criteria early in life, leading to a delay in diagnosis. In addition, the role of genetic testing remains controversial. However, as it becomes more widely available, genetic diagnosis may precede a full clinical diagnosis.

  • BBS has an impact on the quality of life and prognosis of both the patient and the family. Obesity management strategies are an important part of the multidisciplinary approach, as there is no cure available. Setmelanotide has shown promising results in a phase 3 trial, but its effect in clinical practice remains unproven.

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Carolina Chaves Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Hospital Divino Espírito Santo de Ponta Delgada, EPER, Azores Islands, Portugal

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Teresa Kay Department of Medical Genetics, Hospital Dona Estefânia, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central, EPE, Lisbon, Portugal

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João Anselmo Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Hospital Divino Espírito Santo de Ponta Delgada, EPER, Azores Islands, Portugal

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Summary

Leptin is secreted by adipocytes in response to fat storage and binds to its receptor (LEPR), which is ubiquitously expressed throughout the body. Leptin regulates energy expenditure and is anorexigenic. In this study, we describe the clinical and hormonal findings of three siblings with a personal history of rapid weight gain during the first months of life. They had delayed puberty, high levels of FSH (15.6 ± 3.7 mUI/mL; reference: 1.5–12.4) and LH (12.3 ± 2.2 mUI/mL; reference: 1.7–8.6), normal oestradiol and total testosterone and successful fertility. None of the patients had dyslipidemia, diabetes or thyroid disease. Next-generation sequencing identified a pathogenic homozygous variant c.2357T>C, p.(Leu786Pro) in LEPR. Their parents and children were heterozygous for this mutation. We compared clinical and biochemical findings of homozygous carriers with first-degree heterozygous family members and ten randomly selected patients with adult-onset morbid obesity. Homozygous carriers of the mutation had significantly higher BMI (32.2 ± 1.7 kg/m2 vs 44.5 ± 7.1 kg/m2, P = 0.023) and increased serum levels of leptin (26.3 ± 9.3 ng/mL vs 80 ± 36.4 ng/mL, P = 0.028) than their heterozygous relatives. Compared with the ten patients with adult-onset morbid obesity, serum levels of leptin were not significantly higher in homozygous carriers (53.8 ± 24.1 ng/mL vs 80 ± 36.4 ng/mL, P = 0.149), and thus serum levels of leptin were not a useful discriminative marker of LEPR mutations. We described a rare three-generation family with monogenic obesity due to a mutation in LEPR. Patients with early onset obesity should be considered for genetic screening, as the identification of mutations may allow personalized treatment options (e.g. MC4R-agonists) and targeted successful weight loss.

Learning points

  • The early diagnosis of monogenic forms of obesity can be of great interest since new treatments for these conditions are becoming available.

  • Since BMI and leptin levels in patients with leptin receptor mutations are not significantly different from those found in randomly selected morbid obese patients, a careful medical history is mandatory to suspect this condition.

  • Loss of leptin receptor function has been associated with infertility. However, our patients were able to conceive, emphasizing the need for genetic counselling in affected patients with this condition.

Open access
Rigya Arya Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

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Tehmina Ahmad Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

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Satya Dash Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Banting and Best Diabetes Centre, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

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Summary

Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is a rare manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with unclear etiology. When present, CDI in AML has most often been described in patients with chromosome 3 or 7 aberrations and no abnormalities on brain imaging. In this case, we present a woman with newly diagnosed AML t(12;14)(p12;q13) found to have diabetes insipidus (DI) with partial anterior pituitary dysfunction and abnormal brain imaging. While in hospital, the patient developed an elevated serum sodium of 151 mmol/L with a serum osmolality of 323 mmol/kg and urine osmolality of 154 mmol/kg. On history, she reported polyuria and polydipsia for 5 months preceding hospitalization. Based on her clinical symptoms and biochemistry, she was diagnosed with DI and treated using intravenous desmopressin with good effect; sodium improved to 144 mmol/L with a serum osmolality of 302 mmol/kg and urine osmolality of 501 mmol/kg. An MRI of the brain done for the assessment of neurologic involvement revealed symmetric high-T2 signal within the hypothalamus extending into the mamillary bodies bilaterally, a partially empty sella, and loss of the pituitary bright spot. A pituitary panel was completed which suggested partial anterior pituitary dysfunction. The patient’s robust improvement with low-dose desmopressin therapy along with her imaging findings indicated a central rather than nephrogenic cause for her DI. Given the time course of her presentation with respect to her AML diagnosis, MRI findings, and investigations excluding other causes, her CDI and partial anterior pituitary dysfunction were suspected to be secondary to hypothalamic leukemic infiltration.

Learning points

  • Leukemic infiltration of the pituitary gland is a rare cause of central diabetes insipidus (CDI) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  • Patients with AML and CDI may compensate for polyuria and prevent hypernatremia with increased water intake.

  • AML-associated CDI can require long-term desmopressin treatment, independent of AML response to treatment.

Open access
Darija Tudor Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital of Split, Split, Croatia

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Iva Kolombo Department of Pediatrics, Šibenik General Hospital, Šibenik, Croatia

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Ana Tot Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital of Split, Split, Croatia

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Drasko Cikojevic Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Split, Split, Croatia

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Marko Simunovic Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital of Split, Split, Croatia
Department of Pediatrics, University of Split School of Medicine, Split, Croatia

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Veselin Skrabic Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital of Split, Split, Croatia
Department of Pediatrics, University of Split School of Medicine, Split, Croatia

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Summary

This is a case report of a child with chronic hyponatremia due to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) as a paraneoplastic manifestation of olfactory neuroblastoma (OFN). We hereby report a clinical presentation as well as a pragmatic approach to one of the most common electrolytic disorders in the pediatric population and have emphasized the necessity of involving the sinonasal area in the diagnostic procedure while evaluating possible causes of SIADH. This report indicates that the chronicity of the process along with the gradual onset of hyponatremia occurrence is responsible for the lack of neurological symptoms at the moment of disease presentation.

Learning points

  • Hyponatremia is not infrequently attributed to SIADH.

  • Paraneoplastic syndromes are uncommon but they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pediatric SIADH.

  • Chronic insidious hyponatremia may not be associated with clear neurological symptoms despite its severity.

Open access
Matthew Seymour Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Brisbane, Australia
Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

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Thomas Robertson Queensland Pathology, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Brisbane, Australia
Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

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Jason Papacostas Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

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Kirk Morris Department of Haematology, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Brisbane, Australia

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Jennifer Gillespie Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Department of Radiology, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Brisbane, Australia

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Debra Norris QML Pathology, Brisbane, Australia

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Emma L Duncan Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Brisbane, Australia
Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Translational Research Institute, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane Australia

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Summary

A 34-year-old woman presented 18 months post-partum with blurred vision, polyuria, amenorrhoea, headache and general malaise. Comprehensive clinical examination showed left superior temporal visual loss only. Initial investigations revealed panhypopituitarism and MRI demonstrated a sellar mass involving the infundibulum and hypothalamus. Lymphocytic hypophysitis was suspected and high dose glucocorticoids were commenced along with desmopressin and thyroxine. However, her vision rapidly deteriorated. At surgical biopsy, an irresectable grey amorphous mass involving the optic chiasm was identified. Histopathology was initially reported as granulomatous hypophysitis. Despite the ongoing treatment with glucocorticoids, her vision worsened to light detection only. Histopathological review revised the diagnosis to partially treated lymphoma. A PET scan demonstrated avid uptake in the pituitary gland in addition to splenic involvement, lymphadenopathy above and below the diaphragm, and a bone lesion. Excisional node biopsy of an impalpable infraclavicular lymph node confirmed nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma. Hyper-CVAD chemotherapy was commenced, along with rituximab; fluid-balance management during chemotherapy (with its requisite large fluid volumes) was extremely complex given her diabetes insipidus. The patient is now in clinical remission. Panhypopituitarism persists; however, her vision has recovered sufficiently for reading large print and driving. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Hodgkin lymphoma presenting initially as hypopituitarism.

Learning points

  • Lymphoma involving the pituitary is exceedingly rare and, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma presenting as hypopituitarism.

  • There are myriad causes of a sellar mass and this case highlights the importance of reconsidering the diagnosis when patients fail to respond as expected to appropriate therapeutic intervention.

  • This case highlights the difficulties associated with managing panhypopituitary patients receiving chemotherapy, particularly when this involves large volumes of i.v. hydration fluid.

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Tetsuji Wakabayashi Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, Japan

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Akihito Takei Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, Japan

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Nobukazu Okada Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, Japan

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Miki Shinohara Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, Japan

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Manabu Takahashi Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, Japan

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Shuichi Nagashima Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, Japan

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Kenta Okada Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, Japan

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Ken Ebihara Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, Japan

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Shun Ishibashi Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, Japan

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Summary

The underlying genetic drivers of Kallmann syndrome, a rare genetic disorder characterized by anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to impairment in the development of olfactory axons and in the migration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH)-producing neurons during embryonic development, remain largely unknown. SOX10, a key transcription factor involved in the development of neural crest cells and established as one of the causative genes of Waardenburg syndrome, has been shown to be a causative gene of Kallmann syndrome. A 17-year-old male patient, who was diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome on the basis of a hearing impairment and hypopigmented iris at childhood, was referred to our department because of anosmia and delayed puberty. As clinical examination revealed an aplastic olfactory bulb and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, we diagnosed him as having Kallmann syndrome. Incidentally, we elucidated that he also presented with subclinical hypothyroidism without evidence of autoimmune thyroiditis. Direct sequence analysis detected a nonsense SOX10 mutation (c.373C>T, p.Glu125X) in this patient. Since this nonsense mutation has never been published as a germline variant, the SOX10 substitution is a novel mutation that results in Kallmann syndrome and Waardenburg syndrome. This case substantiates the significance of SOX10 as a genetic cause of Kallmann syndrome and Waardenburg syndrome, which possibly share a common pathway in the development of neural crest cells.

Learning points

  • Kallmann syndrome and Waardenburg syndrome possibly share a common pathway during neural crest cell development.

  • SOX10, a key transcription factor involved in the development of neural crest cells, is a common causative gene of Kallmann syndrome and Waardenburg syndrome.

  • Careful evaluation about various phenotypic features may reveal the unknown genetic drivers of Kallmann syndrome.

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Rob Gonsalves Division of Endocrinology, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona, USA

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Kirk Aleck Division of Genetics, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona, USA

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Dorothee Newbern Division of Endocrinology, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona, USA

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Gabriel Shaibi Division of Endocrinology, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona, USA

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Chirag Kapadia Division of Endocrinology, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona, USA

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Oliver Oatman Division of Endocrinology, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona, USA

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Summary

Single-minded homolog 1 (SIM1) is a transcription factor that plays a role in the development of both the hypothalamus and pituitary. SIM1 gene mutations are known to cause obesity in humans, and chromosomal deletions encompassing SIM1 and other genes necessary for pituitary development can cause a Prader–Willi-like syndrome with obesity and hypopituitarism. There have been no reported cases of hypopituitarism linked to a single SIM1 mutation. A 21-month-old male presented to endocrinology clinic with excessive weight gain and severe obesity. History was also notable for excessive drinking and urination. Endocrine workup revealed central hypothyroidism, partial diabetes insipidus, and central adrenal insufficiency. Genetic evaluation revealed a novel mutation in the SIM1 gene. No other genetic abnormalities to account for his obesity and hypopituitarism were identified. While we cannot definitively state this mutation is pathogenic, it is notable that SIM1 plays a role in the development of all three of the patient’s affected hormone axes. He is now 6 years old and remains on treatment for his pituitary hormone deficiencies and continues to exhibit excessive weight gain despite lifestyle interventions.

Learning points:

  • Mutations in SIM1 are a well-recognized cause of monogenic human obesity, and there have been case reports of Prader–Willi-like syndrome and hypopituitarism in patients with chromosomal deletions that contain the SIM1 gene.

  • SIM1 is expressed during the development of the hypothalamus, specifically in neuroendocrine lineages that give rise to the hormones oxytocin, arginine vasopressin, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, corticotropin-releasing hormone, and somatostatin.

  • Pituitary testing should be considered in patients with severe obesity and a known genetic abnormality affecting the SIM1 gene, particularly in the pediatric population.

Open access
Taieb Ach Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Douai Hospital Center, Douai, France
Department of Endocrinology, University Hospital of Farhat Hached Sousse

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Perrine Wojewoda Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Douai Hospital Center, Douai, France

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Flora Toullet Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Douai Hospital Center, Douai, France

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Roxane Ducloux Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Douai Hospital Center, Douai, France

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Véronique Avérous Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Douai Hospital Center, Douai, France

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Summary

Multiple endocrine metastases are a rare but possible complication of lung adenocarcinoma (LAC). Pituitary metastasis is a rare condition with poor clinical expression. Diabetes insipidus (DI) is its most common presenting symptom. Here we report an original case of a pituitary stalk (PS) metastasis from LAC presenting as central DI followed by adrenal insufficiency (AI) from bilateral adrenal metastasis, without known evidence of the primary malignancy. A 45-year-old woman whose first clinical manifestations were polyuria and polydipsia was admitted. She was completely asymptomatic with no cough, no weight loss or anorexia. Chest radiography was normal. Brain MRI showed a thick pituitary stalk (PS). DI was confirmed by water restriction test and treated with vasopressin with great clinical results. Explorations for systemic and infectious disease were negative. Few months later, an acute AI led to discovering bilateral adrenal mass on abdominal CT. A suspicious 2.3 cm apical lung nodule was found later. Histopathological adrenal biopsy revealed an LAC. The patient received systemic chemotherapy with hormonal replacement for endocrinological failures by both vasopressin and hydrocortisone. We present this rare case of metastatic PS thickness arising from LAC associated with bilateral adrenal metastasis. Screening of patients with DI and stalk thickness for lung and breast cancer must be considered. Multiple endocrine failures as a diagnostic motive of LAC is a rare but possible circumstance.

Learning points:

  • Adrenal metastasis is a common location in lung adenocarcinoma; however, metastatic involvement of the pituitary stalk remains a rare occurrence, especially as a leading presentation to diagnose lung cancer.

  • The posterior pituitary and the infundibulum are the preferential sites for metastases, as they receive direct arterial blood supply from hypophyseal arteries.

  • Patients diagnosed with diabetes insipidus due to pituitary stalk thickness should be considered as a metastasis, after exclusion of the classical systemic and infectious diseases.

  • The diagnosis of an endocrinological metastatic primary lung adenocarcinoma for patients without respiratory symptoms is often delayed due to a lack of correlation between endocrinological symptoms and lung cancer.

  • The main originality of our case is the concomitant diagnosis of both endocrinological failures, as it was initiated with a diabetes insipidus and followed by an acute adrenal insufficiency.

Open access
Aishah Ekhzaimy Department of Medicine and College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

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Afshan Masood Obesity Research Center, and College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

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Seham Alzahrani Department of Medicine and College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

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Waleed Al-Ghamdi Department of Medicine and College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

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Daad Alotaibi Department of Medicine and College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

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Muhammad Mujammami Department of Medicine and College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

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Summary

Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and several endocrine disorders previously classified as idiopathic are now considered to be of an autoimmune etiology. Dermatomyositis (DM), a rare autoimmune condition characterized by inflammatory myopathy and skin rashes, is also known to affect the gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and rarely the cardiac systems and the joints. The association of CDI and DM is extremely rare. After an extensive literature search and to the best of our knowledge this is the first reported case in literature, we report the case of a 36-year-old male with a history of CDI, who presented to the hospital’s endocrine outpatient clinic for evaluation of a 3-week history of progressive facial rash accompanied by weakness and aching of the muscles.

Learning points:

  • Accurate biochemical diagnosis should always be followed by etiological investigation.

  • This clinical entity usually constitutes a therapeutic challenge, often requiring a multidisciplinary approach for optimal outcome.

  • Dermatomyositis is an important differential diagnosis in patients presenting with proximal muscle weakness.

  • Associated autoimmune conditions should be considered while evaluating patients with dermatomyositis.

  • Dermatomyositis can relapse at any stage, even following a very long period of remission.

  • Maintenance immunosuppressive therapy should be carefully considered in these patients.

Open access
N Chelaghma Department of Endocrinology, Peterborough City Hospital, Peterborough, UK

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J Rajkanna Department of Endocrinology, Peterborough City Hospital, Peterborough, UK

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J Trotman East Midlands and East of England NHS Genomic Laboratory Hub, Cambridge University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge, UK

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G Fuller East Midlands and East of England NHS Genomic Laboratory Hub, Cambridge University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge, UK

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T Elsey East Midlands and East of England NHS Genomic Laboratory Hub, Cambridge University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge, UK

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SM Park Department of Clinical Genetics, Cambridge University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK

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SO Oyibo Department of Endocrinology, Peterborough City Hospital, Peterborough, UK

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Summary

Hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism is due to impaired or reduced gonadotrophin secretion from the pituitary gland. In the absence of any anatomical or functional lesions of the pituitary or hypothalamic gland, the hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism is referred to as idiopathic hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (IHH). We present a case of a young lady born to consanguineous parents who was found to have IHH due to a rare gene mutation.

Learning points:

  • The genetic basis of a majority of cases of IHH remains unknown.

  • IHH can have different clinical endocrine manifestations.

  • Patients can present late to the healthcare service because of unawareness and stigmata associated with the clinical features.

  • Family members of affected individuals can be affected to varying degrees.

Open access