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Naoya Toriu Nephrology Center and Department of Rheumatology, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

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Masayuki Yamanouchi Nephrology Center and Department of Rheumatology, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

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Rikako Hiramatsu Nephrology Center and Department of Rheumatology, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

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Noriko Hayami Nephrology Center and Department of Rheumatology, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

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Junichi Hoshino Nephrology Center and Department of Rheumatology, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

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Akinari Sekine Nephrology Center and Department of Rheumatology, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

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Masahiro Kawada Nephrology Center and Department of Rheumatology, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

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Eiko Hasegawa Nephrology Center and Department of Rheumatology, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

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Tatsuya Suwabe Nephrology Center and Department of Rheumatology, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

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Keiichi Sumida Nephrology Center and Department of Rheumatology, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

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Toshiharu Ueno Nephrology Center and Department of Rheumatology, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

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Naoki Sawa Nephrology Center and Department of Rheumatology, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

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Kenichi Ohashi Nephrology Center and Department of Rheumatology, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
Department of Pathology, Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan

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Takeshi Fujii Department of Pathology, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

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Kenmei Takaichi Nephrology Center and Department of Rheumatology, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
Okinaka Memorial Institute for Medical Research, Tokyo, Japan

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Motoko Yanagita Department of Nephrology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan

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Tetsuro Kobayasi Okinaka Memorial Institute for Medical Research, Tokyo, Japan

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Yoshifumi Ubara Nephrology Center and Department of Rheumatology, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
Okinaka Memorial Institute for Medical Research, Tokyo, Japan

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Summary

We report the case of a 67-year-old Japanese woman with type 1 diabetes mellitus. At 47 years of age, her hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was 10.0%, and she had overt nephropathy. The first renal biopsy yielded a diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy. Intensive glycemic control was initiated and her HbA1c improved to 6.0%. Renal dysfunction showed no progression for 15 years. At 62 years of age, a second renal biopsy was performed. Glomerular lesions did not show progression but tubulointerstitial fibrosis and vascular lesions showed progression compared with the first biopsy. Intensive glycemic control can prevent the progression of glomerular lesions, but might not be effective for interstitial and vascular lesions.

Learning points:

  • Intensive control of blood glucose can prevent the progression of glomerular lesions.

  • Intensive control of blood glucose may not be able to prevent progression of interstitial and vascular lesions.

  • CSII reduces HbA1c without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia.

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Maria Cabrer Endocrine Unit, Hospital Comarcal d’Inca, Inca, Spain

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Guillermo Serra Endocrine Unit, Hospital Universitari Son Espases, Palma, Spain

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María Soledad Gogorza Endocrine Unit, Hospital Universitari Son Espases, Palma, Spain

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Vicente Pereg Endocrine Unit, Hospital Universitari Son Espases, Palma, Spain

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Summary

Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is a genetic syndrome that may present with hypocalcemia due to primary hypoparathyroidism (PH) at any age. We report a new diagnosis of 22q11.2DS in a 57-year-old man who presented with symptomatic hypocalcemia. It is important to consider genetic causes of hypocalcemia due to PH regardless of age.

Learning points:

  • It is important to discard genetic cause of primary hypoparathyroidism in a patient without autoimmune disease or prior neck surgery.

  • A new diagnosis of a hereditary disease has familial implications and needs genetic counselling.

  • It is also important to discard other syndrome’s comorbidities.

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