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Carlos Tavares Bello Endocrinology Department, Hospital de Egas Moniz, Lisboa, Portugal

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Francisco Sousa Santos Endocrinology Department, Hospital de Egas Moniz, Lisboa, Portugal

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João Sequeira Duarte Endocrinology Department, Hospital de Egas Moniz, Lisboa, Portugal

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Carlos Vasconcelos Endocrinology Department, Hospital de Egas Moniz, Lisboa, Portugal

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Summary

Central diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare clinical entity characterized by low circulating levels of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) presenting with polyuria and volume depletion. Pituitary surgery is the most common cause of central DI in adults. Pituitary and hypothalamic disease, particularly invasive neoplasms, rarely cause DI, being idiopathic cases responsible for the majority of non-surgical cases. HIV patients, especially those with poor virulogical control, are prone to the development of CNS neoplasms, particularly lymphomas. These neoplasms usually become manifest with mass effects and seizures. Central DI and hypopituitarism are uncommon initial manifestations of primary CNS lymphomas. The authors describe the case of 29-year-old female, HIV-positive patient whose CNS lymphoma presented with DI.

Learning points:

  • Central diabetes insipidus has multiple causes and central nervous system lymphomas are not often considered in the differential diagnosis due to their low prevalence.

  • Accurate biochemical diagnosis should always be followed by etiological investigation.

  • The HIV population is at risk for many neoplasms, especially CNS lymphomas.

  • New-onset polyuria in an HIV-positive patient in the absence of focal neurological signs should raise the suspicion for a central nervous system process of neoplastic nature.

  • This clinical entity usually constitutes a therapeutical challenge, often requiring a multidisciplinary approach for optimal outcome.

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Cliona Small HRB Clinical Research Facility, Galway University Hospitals, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland

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Aoife M Egan HRB Clinical Research Facility, Galway University Hospitals, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland

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El Muntasir Elhadi HRB Clinical Research Facility, Galway University Hospitals, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland

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Michael W O’Reilly HRB Clinical Research Facility, Galway University Hospitals, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland

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Aine Cunningham HRB Clinical Research Facility, Galway University Hospitals, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland

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Francis M Finucane HRB Clinical Research Facility, Galway University Hospitals, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland

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Summary

We describe three patients presenting with diabetic ketoacidosis secondary to ketosis prone type 2, rather than type 1 diabetes. All patients were treated according to a standard DKA protocol, but were subsequently able to come off insulin therapy while maintaining good glycaemic control. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes (KPD) presenting with DKA has not been described previously in Irish patients. The absence of islet autoimmunity and evidence of endogenous beta cell function after resolution of DKA are well-established markers of KPD, but are not readily available in the acute setting. Although not emphasised in any current guidelines, we have found that a strong family history of type 2 diabetes and the presence of cutaneous markers of insulin resistance are strongly suggestive of KPD. These could be emphasised in future clinical practice guidelines.

Learning points:

  • Even in white patients, DKA is not synonymous with type 1 diabetes and autoimmune beta cell failure. KPD needs to be considered in all patients presenting with DKA, even though it will not influence their initial treatment.

  • Aside from markers of endogenous beta cell function and islet autoimmunity, which in any case are unlikely to be immediately available to clinicians, consideration of family history of type 2 diabetes and cutaneous markers of insulin resistance might help to identify those with KPD and are more readily apparent in the acute setting, though not emphasised in guidelines.

  • Consideration of KPD should never alter the management of the acute severe metabolic derangement of DKA, and phasing out of insulin therapy requires frequent attendance and meticulous and cautious surveillance by a team of experienced diabetes care providers.

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Benjamin G Challis Metabolic Research Laboratories, Wellcome Trust-MRC Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge, UK

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Chung Thong Lim Metabolic Research Laboratories, Wellcome Trust-MRC Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge, UK

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Alison Cluroe Department of Histopathology, Cambridge University Hospitals Foundation Trust, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge, UK

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Ewen Cameron Department of Gastroenterology, Cambridge University Hospitals Foundation Trust, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge, UK

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Stephen O’Rahilly Metabolic Research Laboratories, Wellcome Trust-MRC Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge, UK

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Summary

McKittrick–Wheelock syndrome (MWS) is a rare consequence of severe dehydration and electrolyte depletion due to mucinous diarrhoea secondary to a rectosigmoid villous adenoma. Reported cases of MWS commonly describe hypersecretion of mucinous diarrhoea in association with dehydration, hypokalaemia, hyponatraemia, hypochloraemia and pre-renal azotemia. Hyperglycaemia and diabetes are rarely reported manifestations of MWS. Herein we describe the case of a 59-year-old woman who presented with new-onset diabetes and severe electrolyte derangement due to a giant rectal villous adenoma. Subsequent endoscopic resection of the tumour cured her diabetes and normalised electrolytes. This case describes a rare cause of ‘curable diabetes’ and indicates hyperaldosteronism and/or whole-body potassium stores as important regulators of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis.

Learning points

  • McKittrick–Wheelock syndrome (MWS) is typically characterised by the triad of pre-renal failure, electrolyte derangement and chronic diarrhoea resulting from a secretory colonic neoplasm.

  • Hyperglycaemia and new-onset diabetes are rare clinical manifestations of MWS.

  • Hyperaldosteronism and/or hypokalaemia may worsen glucose tolerance in MWS.

  • Aggressive replacement of fluid and electrolytes is the mainstay of acute management, with definitive treatment and complete reversal of the metabolic abnormalities being achieved by endoscopic or surgical resection of the neoplasm.

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Michael Dick Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, 85 Park Road, Grafton, Auckland, New Zealand

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Sarah R Catford Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The Alfred Hospital, Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria, 3004, Australia

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Kavita Kumareswaran Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The Alfred Hospital, Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria, 3004, Australia
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Alfred Hospital, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3168, Australia

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Peter Shane Hamblin Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The Alfred Hospital, Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria, 3004, Australia
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Alfred Hospital, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3168, Australia

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Duncan J Topliss Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The Alfred Hospital, Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria, 3004, Australia
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Alfred Hospital, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3168, Australia

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Summary

The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) can occur following traumatic brain injury (TBI), but is usually transient. There are very few case reports describing chronic SIADH and all resolved within 12 months, except for one case complicated by meningo-encephalitis. Persistent symptomatic hyponatremia due to chronic SIADH was present for 4 years following a TBI in a previously well 32-year-old man. Hyponatremia consistent with SIADH initially occurred in the immediate period following a high-speed motorbike accident in 2010. There were associated complications of post-traumatic amnesia and mild cognitive deficits. Normalization of serum sodium was achieved initially with fluid restriction. However, this was not sustained and he subsequently required a permanent 1.2 l restriction to maintain near normal sodium levels. Multiple episodes of acute symptomatic hyponatremia requiring hospitalization occurred over the following years when he repeatedly stopped the fluid restriction. Given the ongoing nature of his hyponatremia and difficulties complying with strict fluid restriction, demeclocycline was commenced in 2014. Normal sodium levels without fluid restriction have been maintained for 6 months since starting demeclocycline. This case illustrates an important long-term effect of TBI, the challenges of complying with permanent fluid restrictions and the potential role of demeclocycline in patients with chronic hyponatremia due to SIADH.

Learning points

  • Hyponatraemia due to SIADH commonly occurs after TBI, but is usually mild and transient.

  • Chronic hyponatraemia due to SIADH following TBI is a rare but important complication.

  • It likely results from damage to the pituitary stalk or posterior pituitary causing inappropriate non-osmotic hypersecretion of ADH.

  • First line management of SIADH is generally fluid restriction, but hypertonic saline may be required in severe cases. Adherence to long-term fluid restriction is challenging. Other options include oral urea, vasopressin receptor antagonists and demeclocycline.

  • While effective, oral urea is poorly tolerated and vasopressin receptor antagonists are currently not licensed for use in Australia or the USA beyond 30 days due to insufficient long-term safety data and specific concerns of hepatotoxicity.

  • Demeclocycline is an effective, well-tolerated and safe option for management of chronic hyponatraemia due to SIADH.

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Arshpreet Kaur Division of Endocrinology Metabolism and Diabetes, University of Louisville, 550 South Jackson Street, ACB A3G11, Louisville, Kentucky, 40202, USA

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Stephen J Winters Division of Endocrinology Metabolism and Diabetes, University of Louisville, 550 South Jackson Street, ACB A3G11, Louisville, Kentucky, 40202, USA

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Summary

Drugs that inhibit the sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2) are an exciting novel, insulin-independent treatment for diabetes that block glucose reabsorption from the proximal tubules of the kidney, leading to increased glucose excretion and lower blood glucose levels. Inhibition of SGLT2 activity also reduces sodium reabsorption, which together with glycosuria produces a mild diuretic effect with the potential for dehydration and hyperkalemia. We report on a 60-year-old man with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes treated with insulin, glimepiride, metformin and canagliflozin, who was admitted with altered mental status after a syncopal episode. He had a 1-week history of ingestion of Tums for heartburn followed by poor appetite and lethargy. Laboratory work-up showed acute kidney injury, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), and parathyroid hormone-independent severe hypercalcemia of 17.4 mg/dl. DKA resolved with insulin treatment, and saline hydration led to improvement in hypercalcemia and renal function over 48 h, but was accompanied by a rapid increase in the serum sodium concentration from 129 to 162 mmol/l despite changing fluids to 0.45% saline. Urine studies were consistent with osmotic diuresis. Hypernatremia was slowly corrected with hypotonic fluids, with improvement in his mental status over the next 2 days. This is the first report of hypercalcemia associated with the use of a SLGT2 inhibitor. Although the exact mechanism is unknown, canagliflozin may predispose to hypercalcemia in patients ingesting excessive calcium because of dehydration from osmotic diuresis, with reduced calcium excretion and possible increased intestinal calcium absorption. Saline therapy and osmotic diuresis may lead to hypernatremia from electrolyte-free water loss.

Learning points

  • Canagliflozin, an SGLT2 inhibitor, may cause hypercalcemia in susceptible patients.

  • Although the exact mechanisms are unknown, dehydration from osmotic diuresis and increased intestinal calcium absorption play a role.

  • Close monitoring of serum calcium levels is recommended in patients treated with SGLT2 inhibitors who are elderly, have established hypercalcemia, or take oral calcium supplements.

  • Saline therapy and osmotic diuresis may lead to hypernatremia from electrolyte-free water loss in susceptible patients.

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