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Fumiaki Kawano Departments of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

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Tadato Yonekawa Neurology, Respirology, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

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Hideki Yamaguchi Neurology, Respirology, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

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Nobuhiro Shibata Clinical Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

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Kousei Tashiro Departments of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

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Makoto Ikenoue Departments of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

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Shun Munakata Departments of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

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Kazuhiro Higuchi Departments of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

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Hiroyuki Tanaka Diagnostic Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

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Yuichiro Sato Diagnostic Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

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Ayumu Hosokawa Clinical Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

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Shinsuke Takeno Departments of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

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Kunihide Nakamura Departments of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

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Atsushi Nanashima Departments of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

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Summary

A 54-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with a cervical tumor. CT revealed a cervical tumor extending to the upper mediastinum, tracheal deviation and tumor infiltration in the cervical vessels. She was followed-up because no diagnosis of malignancy was made by cytology. However, 2 months later, a CT scan showed enlargement of the tumor and tracheal stenosis, and a surgical biopsy was performed and she was diagnosed with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC). The tracheal tube with tracheal stenosis could not be removed due to the rapid growth of the tumor, necessitating management by mechanical ventilation. Due to the difficulty of surgical resection, she was treated with lenvatinib. A lenvatinib solution was made and administered via a nasogastric tube. After lenvatinib treatment, the tumor volume decreased and the tracheal stenosis improved. The tracheal tube was removed and oral intake became possible. She was discharged and received ambulatory lenvatinib therapy. The tumor was significantly reduced in size, but gradually grew and was exposed through the cervical wound 6 months later. Esophageal perforation occurred 10 months after the start of treatment. Lenvatinib was re-administered via a nasogastric tube. Eleven months later, the patient died of massive bleeding from the exposed cervical tumor. Patients with advanced ATC may require management with mechanical ventilation for airway stenosis or with a nasogastric tube for esophageal stenosis and perforation. We experienced a case in which lenvatinib was safely administered via a nasogastric tube while performing mechanical ventilation.

Learning points:

  • An anaplastic thyroid cancer patient under mechanical ventilator management was treated with lenvatinib via a nasogastric tube.

  • The lenvatinib solution can easily be prepared and administered via a nasogastric tube.

  • The lenvatinib solution was effective for a patient with difficulty in oral intake.

  • Lenvatinib could also improve the prognosis of an anaplastic thyroid cancer patient with severe airway and esophageal trouble.

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Anna Popławska-Kita Departments of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Internal Medicine

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Marta Wielogórska Departments of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Internal Medicine

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Łukasz Poplawski Radiology, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland

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Katarzyna Siewko Departments of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Internal Medicine

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Agnieszka Adamska Departments of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Internal Medicine

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Piotr Szumowski Departments of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland

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Piotr Myśliwiec 1st Clinic Department of General and Endocrine Surgery, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland

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Janusz Myśliwiec Departments of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland

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Joanna Reszeć Departments of Medical Pathomorphology, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland

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Grzegorz Kamiński Department of Endocrinology and Radioisotopy Therapy, Military Institute of Medicine, Warsaw, Poland

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Janusz Dzięcioł Departments of Human Anatomy, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland

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Dorota Tobiaszewska Departments of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Internal Medicine

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Małgorzata Szelachowska Departments of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Internal Medicine

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Adam Jacek Krętowski Departments of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Internal Medicine

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Summary

Papillary thyroid gland carcinoma is the most common type of malignancy of the endocrine system. Metastases to the pituitary gland have been described as a complication of papillary thyroid cancer in few reported cases since 1965. We report the case of a 68-year-old female patient with a well-differentiated form of thyroid gland cancer. Despite it being the most common malignant cancer of the endocrine system, with its papillary form being one of the two most frequently diagnosed thyroid cancers, the case we present is extremely rare. Sudden cardiac arrest during ventricular fibrillation occurred during hospitalization. Autopsy of the patient revealed papillary carcinoma of the thyroid, follicular variant, with metastasis to the sella turcica, and concomitant sarcoidosis of heart, lung, and mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. Not only does atypical metastasis make our patient’s case most remarkable, but also the postmortem diagnosis of sarcoidosis makes her case particularly unusual.

Learning points:

  • The goal of presenting this case is to raise awareness of the clinical heterogeneity of papillary cancer and promote early diagnosis of unexpected metastasis and coexisting diseases to improve clinical outcomes.

  • Clinicians must be skeptical. They should not fall into the trap of diagnostic momentum or accept diagnostic labels at face value. Regardless of the potential mechanisms, clinicians should be aware of the possibility of the coexistence of thyroid cancer and sarcoidosis as a differential diagnosis of lymphadenopathy.

  • This case highlights the importance of the diagnostic and therapeutic planning process and raises awareness of the fact that one uncommon disease could be masked by another extremely rare disorder.

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C Greco Unit of Endocrinology, Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
Unit of Endocrinology, Department of Medical Specialties, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Modena, Ospedale Civile di Baggiovara, Modena, Italy

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G Brigante Unit of Endocrinology, Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
Unit of Endocrinology, Department of Medical Specialties, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Modena, Ospedale Civile di Baggiovara, Modena, Italy

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E Taliani Unit of Endocrinology, Department of Medical Specialties, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Modena, Ospedale Civile di Baggiovara, Modena, Italy

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S Corrado Department of Diagnostic, Clinical Medicine and Public Health, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Modena, Modena, Italy

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M Simoni Unit of Endocrinology, Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
Unit of Endocrinology, Department of Medical Specialties, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Modena, Ospedale Civile di Baggiovara, Modena, Italy

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B Madeo Unit of Endocrinology, Department of Medical Specialties, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Modena, Ospedale Civile di Baggiovara, Modena, Italy

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Summary

A 74-year-old man was referred to the Endocrinology Unit because of multinodular goiter. The dominant nodule (1.7 × 1.9 × 2.4 cm), at the medium-superior third of the left lobe, was inhomogeneously hypoechoic, with irregular margins, macrocalcifications and intranodular vascularization. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) was performed. The cytological diagnosis was TIR 2, benign, according to the 2013 Italian thyroid cytology classification system. Moderately high serum calcitonin (s-Ct) (61.5 pg/mL, n.r. 0–7.5) and normal CEA were detected. The Ct level in FNAB wash-out fluid (Ct-FNAB) was 1450 pg/mL. Based on s-Ct and Ct-FNAB levels, patient underwent total thyroidectomy. Macroscopically, a dominant circumscribed nodule of 2 ecm was described; the histological and immunohistochemical features identified medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) with paraganglioma (PG)-like pattern positive for Ct, CEA and chromogranin and negative for S-100 sustentacular cells (SC). Moreover, papillary carcinoma of 3 mm in the right lobe was also associated. No areas of hyperaccumulation of the tracer were documented at Ga68 PET/CT. No RET-proto-oncogene mutations were found. Post-surgery s-Ct levels were within normal range (4 pg/mL). Two years after thyroidectomy, the patient is still disease-free. We reported a case of sporadic and rare variant of MTC: this is the ninth described case of PG-like MTC. In this case, cytologically benign, the clinical suspicion arose from high Ct values at FNAB wash-out fluid. Even if clinical behavior of this variant seems indolent, additional studies are necessary to understand prognoses and predictive factors.

Learning points:

  • Several unusual histological variants of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) have been described such as spindle cell, giant cell, clear cell, melanotic, squamous, angiosarcoma-like variants; even rarer is the paraganglioma (PG)-like pattern.

  • We here describe a case of medullary PG-like thyroid carcinoma in a 74-year-old man. This is a rare histological variant of MTC hardly diagnosed by cytology, since immunohistochemical investigations are necessary.

  • Measurement of calcitonin both in serum and in wash-out fluid from fine-needle aspiration could be an additional tool for an early and non-invasive identification of these variants.

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Haruhiko Yamazaki Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama City, Kanagawa, Japan

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Hiroyuki Iwasaki Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama City, Kanagawa, Japan

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Nobuyasu Suganuma Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama City, Kanagawa, Japan

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Soji Toda Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama City, Kanagawa, Japan

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Katsuhiko Masudo Department of Breast and Thyroid Surgery, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Yokohama City, Kanagawa, Japan

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Hirotaka Nakayama Department of Surgery, Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Yokohama City, Kanagawa, Japan

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Yasushi Rino Department of Surgery, Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Yokohama City, Kanagawa, Japan

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Munetaka Masuda Department of Surgery, Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Yokohama City, Kanagawa, Japan

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Summary

Anaplastic transformation of a primary thyroid tumor whose process can be followed is rare. The objective this study is to report a case of anaplastic transformation of locally advanced papillary thyroid carcinoma after treatment with lenvatinib. A 74-year-old woman consulted a local physician because of cough and bloody sputum. Thyroid cancer with tracheal invasion was suspected on computed tomography (CT) imaging, and she visited our hospital for treatment. We suspected anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) and core needle biopsy was performed. Histologic sections of the core needle biopsy showed that the tumor formed a papillary structure, and we diagnosed papillary thyroid carcinoma. Surgery would have been difficult, and we initiated lenvatinib at a low dose of 8 mg/day. CT on day 40 of lenvatinib treatment revealed that the thyroid tumor had shrunk remarkably. CT on day 111 revealed that tumor regrowth and tracheal invasion had been exacerbated. Core needle biopsy was performed, and histologic sections of the core needle biopsy that was performed after regrowth of the tumor showed that individual cancer cells had large, irregular nuclei, and necrosis was also observed. The immunohistochemical findings were negative for thyroglobulin, and only a few cells were positive for thyroid transcription factor 1, and we diagnosed ATC. Anaplastic transformation of the target lesion may be one of the causes of lenvatinib treatment failure in differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

Learning points:

  • Anaplastic transformation of a primary thyroid tumor whose process can be followed is rare.

  • The resistance mechanism of lenvatinib in treatment for differentiated thyroid carcinoma has not been clarified.

  • Anaplastic transformation of the target lesion may be one of the causes of lenvatinib treatment failure in differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

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Sakshi Jhawar Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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Rahul Lakhotia Medical Oncology Service, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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Mari Suzuki Metabolic Diseases Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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James Welch Metabolic Diseases Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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Sunita K Agarwal Metabolic Diseases Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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John Sharretts Metabolic Diseases Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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Maria Merino Laboratory of Pathology, National Cancer Institute, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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Mark Ahlman Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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Jenny E Blau Metabolic Diseases Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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William F Simonds Metabolic Diseases Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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Jaydira Del Rivero Pediatric Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

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Summary

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by parathyroid, anterior pituitary and enteropancreatic endocrine cell tumors. Neuroendocrine tumors occur in approximately in 5–15% of MEN1 patients. Very few cases of ovarian NETs have been reported in association with clinical MEN1 and without genetic testing confirmation. Thirty-three-year-old woman with MEN1 was found to have right adnexal mass on computed tomography (CT). Attempt at laparoscopic removal was unsuccessful, and mass was removed via a minilaparotomy in piecemeal fashion. Pathology showed ovarian NET arising from a teratoma. Four years later, patient presented with recurrence involving the pelvis and anterior abdominal wall. She was treated with debulking surgery and somatostatin analogs (SSAs). Targeted DNA sequencing analysis on the primary adnexal mass as well as the recurrent abdominal wall tumor confirmed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the MEN1 gene locus. This case represents to our knowledge, the first genetically confirmed case of ovarian NET arising by a MEN1 mechanism in a patient with MEN1. Extreme caution should be exercised during surgery as failure to remove an ovarian NET en masse can result in peritoneal seeding and recurrence. For patients with advanced ovarian NETs, systemic therapy options include SSAs, peptide receptor radioligand therapy (PRRT) and novel agents targeting mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).

Learning points:

  • Ovarian NET can arise from a MEN1 mechanism, and any adnexal mass in a MEN1 patient can be considered as a possible malignant NET.

  • Given the rarity of this disease, limited data are available on prognostication and treatment. Management strategies are extrapolated from evidence available in NETs from primaries of other origins.

  • Care should be exercised to remove ovarian NETs en bloc as failure to do so may result in peritoneal seeding and recurrence.

  • Treatment options for advanced disease include debulking surgery, SSAs, TKIs, mTOR inhibitors, PRRT and chemotherapy.

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Haruhiko Yamazaki Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama, Japan

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Hiroyuki Iwasaki Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama, Japan

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Yoichiro Okubo Department of Pathology, Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama, Japan

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Nobuyasu Suganuma Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama, Japan

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Katsuhiko Masudo Department of Breast and Thyroid Surgery, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Yokohama, Japan

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Hirotaka Nakayama Department of Surgery, Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan

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Yasushi Rino Department of Surgery, Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan

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Munetaka Masuda Department of Surgery, Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan

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Summary

The objective this study is to report two cases of thyroid gland invasion by upper mediastinal carcinoma. Mediastinal tumors are uncommon and represent 3% of the tumors seen within the chest. In reports on mediastinal masses, the incidence of malignant lesions ranged from 25 to 49%. The thyroid gland can be directly invaded by surrounding organ cancers. We report these cases contrasting them to the case of a thyroid cancer with mediastinal lesions. Case 1 was a 73-year-old woman who was diagnosed with papillary thyroid carcinoma, and she underwent surgery and postoperative radioactive iodine. Case 2 was a 74-year-old man who was diagnosed with non-small-cell lung carcinoma, favor squamous cell carcinoma, and he underwent chemoradiotherapy. Case 3 was a 77-year-old man who was diagnosed a thymic carcinoma based on pathological findings and referred the patient to thoracic surgeons for surgical management. The images of the three cases were similar, and the differential diagnoses were difficult and required pathological examination. Primary thyroid carcinoma and invading carcinoma originating from the adjacent organs need to be distinguished because their prognoses and treatment strategies are different. It is important to properly diagnose them by images and pathological findings.

Learning points:

  • The thyroid gland in the anterior neck can be directly invaded by surrounding organ cancers.

  • Primary thyroid carcinoma and invading carcinoma originating from the adjacent organs need to be distinguished because their prognoses and treatment strategies are different.

  • It is important to properly diagnose by images and pathological findings.

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Carlos Tavares Bello Endocrinology Department, Hospital de Egas Moniz, Lisbon, Portugal

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Patricia Cipriano
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Vanessa Henriques
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João Sequeira Duarte
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Conceição Canas Marques
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Summary

Granular cell tumours (GCT) are rare, slow-growing, benign neoplasms that are usually located in the head and neck. They are more frequent in the female gender and typically have an asymptomatic clinical course, being diagnosed only at autopsy. Symptomatic GCT of the neurohypophysis are exceedingly rare, being less than 70 cases described so far. The authors report on a case of a 28-year-old male that presented to the Endocrinology clinic with clinical and biochemical evidence of hypogonadism. He also reported minor headaches without any major visual symptoms. Further laboratory tests confirmed hypopituitarism (hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, central hypothyroidism and hypocortisolism) and central nervous system imaging revealed a pituitary macroadenoma. The patient underwent transcranial pituitary adenoma resection and the pathology report described a GCT of the neurohypophysis with low mitotic index. The reported case is noteworthy for the rarity of the clinicopathological entity.

Learning points:

  • Symptomatic GCTs are rare CNS tumours whose cell of origin is not well defined that usually give rise to visual symptoms, headache and endocrine dysfunction.

  • Imaging is quite unspecific and diagnosis is difficult to establish preoperatively.

  • Surgical excision is challenging due to lesion’s high vascularity and propensity to adhere to adjacent structures.

  • The reported case is noteworthy for the rarity of the clinicopathological entity.

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Joseph A Chorny Department of Pathology, Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Denver, Colorado, USA

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John J Orrego Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Denver, Colorado, USA

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José Manuel Cameselle-Teijeiro Department of Anatomic Pathology, Clinical University Hospital, Santiago de Compostela, Spain

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Summary

Most medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTCs) are low grade and produce calcitonin. There are some calcitonin-negative MTCs that produce only calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Rarely, MTCs are negative for calcitonin and CGRP peptides, but contain their corresponding mRNAs. Primary thyroid neuroendocrine neoplasms other than MTCs are extremely rare. We describe a primary high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma that was negative for CGRP and calcitonin at both the protein and mRNA levels. A 42-year-old woman presented with a rapidly enlarging thyroid mass replacing most of the left lobe and isthmus. A computed tomography-guided core-needle biopsy was performed. The tumor was composed of sheets of small-to-medium sized epithelial cells. The cells were immunoreactive for pancytokeratin, synaptophysin, CD56 and thyroid transcription factor-1, but negative for CK7, CK20, CD45, CD99, ERG, chromogranin A, thyroglobulin, calcitonin, CGRP and carcinoembryonic antigen. The Ki-67 proliferation index was ~90%. In situ hybridization was negative for calcitonin mRNA. The patient was initially diagnosed as having a small cell carcinoma. She was treated with cisplatin and etoposide (VP16), followed by radiation therapy. Given the excellent clinical course, the tumor was reviewed and reclassified as a high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma (non-small-cell type). Heretofore, only a few other similar high-grade neuroendocrine tumors with negative markers of C-cell derivation have been reported. In our case, the patient is cancer free five years after diagnosis, but in the other cases, the outcome was poor.

Learning points:

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Tsung-Chun Huang Departments of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

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Yu-Kai Cheng Departments of Neurosurgery

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Tsung-Wei Chen Departments of Pathology, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan

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Yung-Chang Hsu Departments of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

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En-Wei Liu Departments of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

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Hsin-Han Chen Departments of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

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Summary

Thyroid cancer with cranial metastasis in a pregnant woman is very rare. In the literature, most cases are diagnosed early from neurogenic signs or symptomatic thyroid gland. Pregnancy also contributes to a hesitation toward early surgical and medical treatments. We reported a scalp tumor in a physically healthy 37-year-old pregnant female with a follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) with lung, bone and cranial metastasis in initial presentation. Silent neurogenic and physical examinations make an early diagnosis very challenging. Resection of scalp and intracranial tumor, a thyroidectomy, post-operative radioactive iodine therapy and tyrosine kinase inhibitors were employed as treatment. The scalp tumor was confirmed as a metastatic follicular thyroid carcinoma via positive immunoreactivity for thyroglobulin and thyroid transcription factor 1 in tumor cells. Blood examination revealed an elevated thyroglobulin level (>5335 ng/mL). The patient was discharged without any neurological deficit. An asymptomatic scalp tumor in a pregnant woman with a normal thyroid disease history needs differential diagnosis from intracranial origin. Rapid progression and an elevated thyroglobulin level are the indicators that further image study is needed. Aggressive surgical excision of resectable thyroid gland and metastatic tumor are essential for a longer survival rate. There is nothing to indicate that a post-partum operation will worsen prognosis.

Learning points:

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