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Open access

Danielle R Bullock, Bradley S Miller, H Brent Clark and Patricia M Hobday

Summary

IgG4-related hypophysitis is an important diagnostic consideration in patients with a pituitary mass or pituitary dysfunction and can initially present with headaches, visual field deficits and/or endocrine dysfunction. Isolated IgG4-related pituitary disease is rare, with most cases of IgG4-related disease involving additional organ systems. We report the case of a teenage female patient with isolated IgG4-related hypophysitis, diagnosed after initially presenting with headaches. Our patient had no presenting endocrinologic abnormalities. She was treated with surgical resection, prednisolone and rituximab with no further progression of disease and sustained normal endocrine function. This case, the youngest described patient with isolated IgG4-related hypophysitis and uniquely lacking endocrinologic abnormalities, adds to the limited reports of isolated pituitary disease. The use of rituximab for isolated pituitary disease has never been described. While IgG4-related hypophysitis has been increasingly recognized, substantial evidence concerning the appropriate treatment and follow-up of these patients is largely lacking.

Learning points:

  • IgG4-related hypophysitis most often occurs in the setting of additional organ involvement but can be an isolated finding. This diagnosis should therefore be considered in a patient presenting with pituitary abnormalities.

  • Most patients with IgG4-related hypophysitis will have abnormal pituitary function, but normal functioning does not exclude this diagnosis.

  • Corticosteroids have been the mainstay of therapy for IgG4-related disease, with other immunosuppressive regimens being reserved for refractory cases. Further research is needed to understand the effectiveness of corticosteroid-sparing regimens and whether there is utility in using these agents as first-line therapies.

Open access

Leanne Hunt, Barney Harrison, Matthew Bull, Tim Stephenson and Amit Allahabadia

Summary

This case report reviews the rare condition of Riedel’s thyroiditis via a patient case. The report highlights the difficulties that one may encounter when managing such a case in regards to patient symptoms, side effects of medications and the relapsing nature of the condition. The case report also highlights novel treatment in the treatment of Riedel’s thyroiditis, rituximab, how this works and the resolution of symptoms that we have achieved with our patient on this treatment.

Learning points:

  • Riedel’s thyroiditis is characterised by chronic inflammation, which causes dense fibrosis in the thyroid gland.

  • Riedel’s thyroiditis can present with neck pain, dysphagia and dyspnoea with a firm, non-tender mass found on examination.

  • Riedel’s thyroiditis is part of the IgG4-related systemic disorders.

  • Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that works against the protein CD20.

Open access

A León-Suárez, P Roldán-Sarmiento, M A Gómez-Sámano, A Nava-De la Vega, V M Enríquez-Estrada, F J Gómez-Pérez and D Cuevas-Ramos

Summary

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a hematological tumor caused by abnormal lymphoid proliferation. NHL can arise in any part of the body, including central nervous system (CNS). However, pituitary involvement is a quite rare presentation. The diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common subtype when pituitary is infiltrated. Here, we report a case of pituitary infiltration of NHL DLBCL type in a woman with hypopituitarism and an infundibulum-hypophysitis-like image on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A female aged 64 years, complained of dyspepsia, fatigue, weight loss and urine volume increment with thirst. Endoscopy and gastric biopsy confirmed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Treatment with chemotherapy using R-CHOP was initiated. During her hospitalization, hypotension and polyuria were confirmed. Hormonal evaluation was compatible with central diabetes insipidus and hypopituitarism. Simple T1 sequence of MRI showed thickening of the infundibular stalk with homogeneous enhancement. After lumbar puncture analysis, CNS infiltration was confirmed showing positive atypical lymphocytes. Pituitary and infundibular stalk size normalized after R-CHOP chemotherapy treatment. In conclusion, pituitary infiltration of NHL with infundibular-hypophysitis-like image on MRI is a rare finding. Clinical picture included hypopituitarism and central diabetes insipidus. Diagnosis should be suspected after biochemical analysis and MRI results. Treatment consists of chemotherapy against NHL and hormonal replacement for pituitary dysfunction.

Learning points:

  • Pituitary infiltration by lymphoma can present with signs and symptoms of panhypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus.

  • MRI findings can resemble an autoimmune hypophysitis.

  • Patients can recover pituitary function as well as normalization of MRI after chemotherapy treatment.

Open access

Akira Kurozumi, Yosuke Okada, Tadashi Arao, Yusuke Miyazaki, Maiko Yoshikawa, Keiichi Torimoto, Satoshi Kubo, Shingo Nakayamada and Yoshiya Tanaka

Summary

A randomized controlled study of rituximab demonstrated that the drug protects pancreatic function in patients with acute-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (AOT1DM). However, the mechanism of this protective effect is poorly understood. We examined the effects of rituximab in two patients with AOT1DM in the honeymoon period and the mechanism of these effects. Case 1 was a 40-year-old man and Case 2 was a 45-year-old man, both diagnosed with AOT1DM. Various tests indicated intact capacity for endogenous insulin secretion and that they were in the honeymoon phase of AOT1DM. Treatment with rituximab protected against pancreatic β-cell damage and maintained somewhat the endogenous insulin secretion. In Case 2, HbA1c level was maintained below 6.5% up to 24 months after treatment. However, in Case 1, the patient showed a gradual increase in HbA1c level starting around 9 months but fell at 12 months to >9.0% and required an insulin dose about twice greater than that of Case 2. High spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) levels were recorded in the two patients before rituximab administration and after the treatment, the levels were further increased in Case 1, but decreased in Case 2. Both patients require continuous careful follow-up for glycemic control, insulin secretion capacity, and adverse reactions in the future. Although the clinical relevance of high Syk levels in AOT1DM patients remains unclear, the difference in the change in Syk level between the two patients may explain the different clinical courses.

Learning points

  • We described the pancreas-protective effect of rituximab in two patients with acute-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus in the honeymoon period and investigated the possible mechanism of action.

  • The present study demonstrated that treatment with rituximab maintained endogenous insulin secretion capacity for 2 years in the two patients.

  • The phosphorylated-spleen tyrosine kinase (p-Syk) data suggest that the differences in HbA1c level and the required insulin dose between the two patients could be due to reactivation or nonreactivation of β-cells.

Open access

N Jassam, N Amin, P Holland, R K Semple, D J Halsall, G Wark and J H Barth

Summary

A lean 15-year-old girl was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes based on symptomatic hyperglycaemia and positive anti-islet cell antibodies. Glycaemia was initially stabilised on twice-daily mixed insulin. After 11 months from the time of diagnosis, she complained of hyperglycaemia and ketosis alternating with hypoglycaemia. This progressively worsened until prolonged hospital admission was required for treatment of refractory hypoglycaemia. A high titre of anti-insulin antibodies was detected associated with a very low recovery of immunoreactive (free) insulin from plasma after precipitation with polyethylene glycol, suggesting the presence of insulin in bound complexes. Insulin autoimmune syndrome was diagnosed and metabolic fluctuations were initially managed supportively. However, due to poor glucose control, immunosuppressive therapy was initiated first with steroids and plasmapheresis and later with anti-CD20 antibody therapy (Rituximab). This treatment was associated with a gradual disappearance of anti-insulin antibodies and her underlying type 1 diabetes has subsequently been successfully managed with an insulin pump.

Learning points

  • Anti-insulin antibodies may result in low levels of free insulin.

  • Polyclonal anti-insulin antibodies can interfere with the pharmacological action of administered insulin, resulting in hypoglycaemia and insulin resistance, due to varying affinities and capacities.

  • In this patient, rituximab administration was associated with a gradual disappearance of anti-insulin antibodies.

  • It is hypothesised that this patient had subcutaneous insulin resistance (SIR) caused by insulin capture at the tissue level, either by antibodies or by sequestration.

  • A prolonged tissue resistance protocol may be more appropriate in patients with immune-mediated SIR syndrome.