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Open access

Pradeep Vasudevan, Corrina Powell, Adeline K Nicholas, Ian Scudamore, James Greening, Soo-Mi Park and Nadia Schoenmakers

Summary

In the absence of maternal thyroid disease or iodine deficiency, fetal goitre is rare and usually attributable to dyshormonogenesis, for which genetic ascertainment is not always undertaken in the UK. Mechanical complications include tracheal and oesophageal compression with resultant polyhydramnios, malpresentation at delivery and neonatal respiratory distress. We report an Indian kindred in which the proband (first-born son) had congenital hypothyroidism (CH) without obvious neonatal goitre. His mother’s second pregnancy was complicated by fetal hypothyroid goitre and polyhydramnios, prompting amniotic fluid drainage and intraamniotic therapy (with liothyronine, T3 and levothyroxine, T4). Sadly, intrauterine death occurred at 31 weeks. Genetic studies in the proband demonstrated compound heterozygous novel (c.5178delT, p.A1727Hfs*26) and previously described (c.7123G > A, p.G2375R) thyroglobulin (TG) mutations which are the likely cause of fetal goitre in the deceased sibling. TG mutations rarely cause fetal goitre, and management remains controversial due to the potential complications of intrauterine therapy however an amelioration in goitre size may be achieved with intraamniotic T4, and intraamniotic T3/T4 combination has achieved a favourable outcome in one case. A conservative approach, with surveillance, elective delivery and commencement of levothyroxine neonatally may also be justified, although intubation may be required post delivery for respiratory obstruction. Our observations highlight the lethality which may be associated with fetal goitre. Additionally, although this complication may recur in successive pregnancies, our case highlights the possibility of discordance for fetal goitre in siblings harbouring the same dyshormonogenesis-associated genetic mutations. Genetic ascertainment may facilitate prenatal diagnosis and assist management in familial cases.

Learning points:

  • CH due to biallelic, loss-of-function TG mutations is well-described and readily treatable in childhood however mechanical complications from associated fetal goitre may include polyhydramnios, neonatal respiratory compromise and neck hyperextension with dystocia complicating delivery.

  • CH due to TG mutations may manifest with variable phenotypes, even within the same kindred.

  • Treatment options for hypothyroid dyshormogenic fetal goitre in a euthyroid mother include intraamniotic thyroid hormone replacement in cases with polyhydramnios or significant tracheal obstruction. Alternatively, cases may be managed conservatively with radiological surveillance, elective delivery and neonatal levothyroxine treatment, although intubation and ventilation may be required to support neonatal respiratory compromise.

  • Genetic ascertainment in such kindreds may enable prenatal diagnosis and anticipatory planning for antenatal management of further affected offspring.

Open access

K Majumdar, M Barnard, S Ramachandra, M Berovic and M Powell

Summary

Tuberculosis (TB) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity across the world. In 2–5% of all cases of systemic TB, the C is affected, with lesions reported in the meninges, cortex and ventricles. Intrasellar tuberculomas, however, are extremely rare. We report the interesting case of a young female patient who presented with secondary hypothyroidism and hyperprolactinaemia. She was treated successfully for pituitary TB. We also highlight and discuss some interesting (and hitherto unreported) endocrine issues. Radiological and histological features and treatment of pituitary TB are discussed using this case as an example.

Learning points

  • Intrasellar TB continues to be a rare presentation, but incidence and prevalence are expected to grow with increasing numbers of multidrug-resistant TB and shrinking geographical boundaries across the world.

  • Pituitary TB can present with features of a typical adenoma, but has certain radiological and histological features that help to differentiate from an adenoma.

  • Patients can present with a variety of endocrine abnormalities at different times.

  • The presence of an intrasellar mass in individuals at a high risk of developing TB, or with a previous history of systemic TB, should prompt the diagnosis of pituitary TB. In such individuals, it may be worth considering a trial of anti-tuberculous therapy, before considering surgery.

Open access

Mahmud Abo Salook, Carlos Benbassat, Yulia Strenov and Amit Tirosh

Summary

A 55-year-old male, with a positive medical history for hypothyroidism, treated with stable doses for years was admitted with subacute thyroiditis and a feeling of pain and pressure in the neck. Laboratory tests showed decrease in TSH levels, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and very high antithyroid antibodies. Owing to enlarging goiter and exacerbation in the patient's complaints, he was operated with excision of a fibrotic and enlarged thyroid lobe. Elevated IgG4 plasma levels and high IgG4/IgG plasma cell ratio on immunohistochemistry led to the diagnosis of IgG4-mediated thyroiditis. We concluded that IgG4-thyroiditis and IgG4-related disease should be considered in all patients with an aggressive form of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

Learning points

  • IgG4-related disease is a systemic disease that includes several syndromes; IgG4-related thyroiditis is one among them.

  • IgG4-thyroiditis should be considered in all patients with an aggressive form of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  • Patients with suspected IgG4-thyroiditis should have blood tested for IgG4/IgG ratio and appropriate immunohistochemical staining if possible.