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M A Shehab Department of Endocrinology, BSMMU, Dhaka, Bangladesh

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Tahseen Mahmood Department of Endocrinology, BSMMU, Dhaka, Bangladesh

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M A Hasanat Department of Endocrinology, BSMMU, Dhaka, Bangladesh

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Md Fariduddin Department of Endocrinology, BSMMU, Dhaka, Bangladesh

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Nazmul Ahsan Department of Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology, University of Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh

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Mohammad Shahnoor Hossain Department of Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology, University of Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh

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Md Shahdat Hossain Department of Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology, University of Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh

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Sharmin Jahan Department of Endocrinology, BSMMU, Dhaka, Bangladesh

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Summary

Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to the three-beta-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) enzyme deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder presenting with sexual precocity in a phenotypic male. Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is the most common sex chromosome aneuploidy presenting with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism in a male. However, only a handful of cases of mosaic KS have been described in the literature. The co-existence of mosaic KS with CAH due to 3β-HSD enzyme deficiency portrays a unique diagnostic paradox where features of gonadal androgen deficiency are masked by simultaneous adrenal androgen excess. Here, we report a 7-year-old phenotypic male boy who, at birth presented with ambiguous genitalia, probably a microphallus with penoscrotal hypospadias. Later on, he developed accelerated growth with advanced bone age, premature pubarche, phallic enlargement and hyperpigmentation. Biochemically, the patient was proven to have CAH due to 3β-HSD deficiency. However, the co-existence of bilateral cryptorchidism made us to consider the possibility of hypogonadism as well, and it was further explained by concurrent existence of mosaic KS (47,XXY/46,XX). He was started on glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement and underwent right-sided orchidopexy on a later date. He showed significant clinical and biochemical improvement on subsequent follow-up. However, the declining value of serum testosterone was accompanied by rising level of FSH thereby unmasking hypergonadotropic hypogonadism due to mosaic KS. In future, we are planning to place him on androgen replacement as well.

Learning points:

  • Ambiguous genitalia with subsequent development of sexual precocity in a phenotypic male points towards some unusual varieties of CAH.

  • High level of serum testosterone, adrenal androgen, plasma ACTH and low basal cortisol are proof of CAH, whereas elevated level of 17-OH pregnenolone is biochemical marker of 3β-HSD enzyme deficiency.

  • Final diagnosis can be obtained with sequencing of HSD3B2 gene showing various mutations.

  • Presence of bilateral cryptorchidism in such a patient may be due to underlying hypogonadism.

  • Karyotyping in such patient may rarely show mosaic KS (47,XXY/46,XX) and there might be unmasking of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism resulting from adrenal androgen suppression from glucocorticoid treatment.

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Taieb Ach Departments of Internal Medicine and Endocrinology, University Hospital Fattouma Bourguiba Monastir, Monastir, Tunisia

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Hela Marmouch Departments of Internal Medicine and Endocrinology, University Hospital Fattouma Bourguiba Monastir, Monastir, Tunisia

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Dorra Elguiche Departments of Internal Medicine and Endocrinology, University Hospital Fattouma Bourguiba Monastir, Monastir, Tunisia

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Asma Achour Departments of Internal Medicine and Endocrinology and Radiology, University Hospital Fattouma Bourguiba Monastir, Monastir, Tunisia

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Hajer Marzouk Departments of Internal Medicine and Endocrinology, University Hospital Fattouma Bourguiba Monastir, Monastir, Tunisia

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Hanene Sayadi Departments of Internal Medicine and Endocrinology, University Hospital Fattouma Bourguiba Monastir, Monastir, Tunisia

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Ines Khochtali Departments of Internal Medicine and Endocrinology, University Hospital Fattouma Bourguiba Monastir, Monastir, Tunisia

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Mondher Golli Departments of Internal Medicine and Endocrinology and Radiology, University Hospital Fattouma Bourguiba Monastir, Monastir, Tunisia

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Summary

Kallmann syndrome (KS) is a form of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in combination with a defect in sense of smell, due to abnormal migration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone-producing neurons. We report a case of a 17-year-old Tunisian male who presented with eunuchoid body proportions, absence of facial, axillary and pubic hair, micropenis and surgically corrected cryptorchidism. Associated findings included anosmia. Karyotype was 46XY and hormonal measurement hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. MRI of the brain showed bilateral agenesis of the olfactory bulbs and 3.5 mm pituitary microadenoma. Hormonal assays showed no evidence of pituitary hypersecretion.

Learning points:

  • The main clinical characteristics of KS include hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia or hyposmia.

  • MRI, as a non-irradiating technique, should be the first radiological step for investigating the pituitary gland as well as abnormalities of the ethmoid, olfactory bulbs and tracts in KS.

  • KS may include anterior pituitary hypoplasia or an empty sella syndrome. The originality of our case is that a microadenoma also may be encountered in KS. Hormonal assessment indicated the microadenoma was non-functioning. This emphasizes the importance of visualizing the pituitary region in KS patients to assess for hypoplastic pituitary malformations or adenomas.

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Maria Cabrer Endocrine Unit, Hospital Comarcal d’Inca, Inca, Spain

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Guillermo Serra Endocrine Unit, Hospital Universitari Son Espases, Palma, Spain

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María Soledad Gogorza Endocrine Unit, Hospital Universitari Son Espases, Palma, Spain

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Vicente Pereg Endocrine Unit, Hospital Universitari Son Espases, Palma, Spain

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Summary

Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is a genetic syndrome that may present with hypocalcemia due to primary hypoparathyroidism (PH) at any age. We report a new diagnosis of 22q11.2DS in a 57-year-old man who presented with symptomatic hypocalcemia. It is important to consider genetic causes of hypocalcemia due to PH regardless of age.

Learning points:

  • It is important to discard genetic cause of primary hypoparathyroidism in a patient without autoimmune disease or prior neck surgery.

  • A new diagnosis of a hereditary disease has familial implications and needs genetic counselling.

  • It is also important to discard other syndrome’s comorbidities.

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Anil Piya Laboratory of Biochemistry, Mercer University School of Medicine, Savannah, Georgia, USA
Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Memorial University Medical Center, Savannah, Georgia, USA

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Jasmeet Kaur Laboratory of Biochemistry, Mercer University School of Medicine, Savannah, Georgia, USA
Anderson Cancer Institute, Memorial University Medical Center, Savannah, Georgia, USA

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Alan M Rice Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Memorial University Medical Center, Savannah, Georgia, USA
Augusta University School of Medicine, Augusta, Georgia, USA

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Himangshu S Bose Laboratory of Biochemistry, Mercer University School of Medicine, Savannah, Georgia, USA
Anderson Cancer Institute, Memorial University Medical Center, Savannah, Georgia, USA

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Summary

Cholesterol transport into the mitochondria is required for synthesis of the first steroid, pregnenolone. Cholesterol is transported by the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), which acts at the outer mitochondrial membrane prior to its import. Mutations in the STAR protein result in lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). Although the STAR protein consists of seven exons, biochemical analysis in nonsteroidogenic COS-1 cells showed that the first two were not essential for pregnenolone synthesis. Here, we present a patient with ambiguous genitalia, salt-lossing crisis within two weeks after birth and low cortisol levels. Sequence analysis of the STAR, including the exon–intron boundaries, showed the complete deletion of exon 1 as well as more than 50 nucleotides upstream of STAR promoter. Mitochondrial protein import with the translated protein through synthesis cassette of the mutant STAR lacking exon 1 showed protein translation, but it is less likely to have synthesized without a promoter in our patient. Thus, a full-length STAR gene is necessary for physiological mitochondrial cholesterol transport in vivo.

Learning points:

  • STAR exon 1 deletion caused lipoid CAH.

  • Exon 1 substitution does not affect biochemical activity.

  • StAR promoter is responsible for gonadal development.

Open access
Rossella Mazzilli Andrology Unit, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Via di Grottarossa 103500189, Rome, Italy

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Michele Delfino Andrology Unit, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Via di Grottarossa 103500189, Rome, Italy

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Jlenia Elia Andrology Unit, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Via di Grottarossa 103500189, Rome, Italy

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Francesco Benedetti Andrology Unit, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Via di Grottarossa 103500189, Rome, Italy

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Laura Alesi Genetics Unit, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Via di Grottarossa 103500189, Rome, Italy

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Luciana Chessa Genetics Unit, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Via di Grottarossa 103500189, Rome, Italy

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Fernando Mazzilli Andrology Unit, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Via di Grottarossa 103500189, Rome, Italy

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Summary

We report the case of a 19-year-old boy, presenting several congenital malformations (facial dysmorphisms, cardiac and musculoskeletal abnormalities), mental retardation, recurrent respiratory infections during growth and delayed puberty. Although previously hospitalised in other medical centres, only psychological support had been recommended for this patient. In our department, genetic, biochemical/hormonal and ultrasound examinations were undertaken. The karyotype was 49,XXXXY, a rare aneuploidy with an incidence of 1/85 000–100 000, characterised by the presence of three extra X chromosomes in phenotypically male subjects. The hormonal/biochemical profile showed hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, insulin resistance and vitamin D deficiency. The patient was then treated with testosterone replacement therapy. After 12 months of treatment, we observed the normalisation of testosterone levels. There was also an increase in pubic hair growth, testicular volume and penis size, weight loss, homeostatic model assessment index reduction and the normalisation of vitamin D values. Moreover, the patient showed greater interaction with the social environment and context.

Learning points

  • In cases of plurimalformative syndrome, cognitive impairment, recurrent infections during growth and, primarily, delayed puberty, it is necessary to ascertain as soon as possible whether the patient is suffering from hypogonadism or metabolic disorders due to genetic causes. In our case, the diagnosis of hypogonadism, and then of 49,XXXXY syndrome, was unfortunately made only at the age of 19 years.

  • The testosterone replacement treatment, even though delayed, induced positive effects on: i) development of the reproductive system, ii) regulation of the metabolic profile and iii) interaction with the social environment and context.

  • However, earlier and timely hormonal replacement treatment could probably have improved the quality of life of this subject and his family.

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Aysenur Ozderya Division of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, Kartal Dr Lutfi Kirdar Training and Research Hospital, 34890, Istanbul, Turkey

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Sule Temizkan Division of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, Kartal Dr Lutfi Kirdar Training and Research Hospital, 34890, Istanbul, Turkey

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Kadriye Aydin Tezcan Division of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, Kartal Dr Lutfi Kirdar Training and Research Hospital, 34890, Istanbul, Turkey

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Feyza Yener Ozturk Division of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, Sisli Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey

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Yuksel Altuntas Division of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, Sisli Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey

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Summary

Madelung's disease is a rare fat metabolism disorder characterised by benign multiple symmetric, encapsulated lipomatosis. The exact cause of the disease is unknown; it may be associated with chronic alcoholism and mutations in mitochondrial DNA (A8344G), but there have been cases without these factors reported in the literature. A 29-year-old man with a 6-year history of diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital for poorly regulated diabetes and decreased libido. He was not an alcohol consumer. His family history was unremarkable. Physical examination revealed that he had a eunuchoid body shape. There was a symmetric excess fat accumulation in his submandibular, deltoid, nuchal, suprapubic and inguinal areas. He was diagnosed with Madelung's disease, and imaging studies supported the diagnosis. Hormonal evaluation revealed a hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Karyotype analysis revealed a 47,XXY mutation. Genetic research showed no mitochondrial DNA mutation. Metabolic disorders, such as diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidaemia, hyperuricaemia and liver disease, endocrine gland diseases, such as hypothyroidism, and neurological diseases, such as polyneuropathy and cognitive disorders, may accompany Madelung's disease. The present study represents the first reported case of Madelung's disease accompanied by Klinefelter's syndrome.

Learning points

  • Madelung's disease is a rare fat metabolism disorder characterised by benign multiple symmetric and encapsulated lipid accumulation.

  • The exact cause of the disease is unknown.

  • Metabolic disorders, such as diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidaemia, hyperuricaemia and liver disease, endocrine gland diseases, such as hypothyroidism, and neurological diseases, such as polyneuropathy and cognitive disorders, may accompany Madelung's disease.

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