Browse

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items

Katta Sai Department of Internal Medicine, Saint Vincent Hospital at Worcester Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA

Search for other papers by Katta Sai in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Amos Lal Department of Internal Medicine, Saint Vincent Hospital at Worcester Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA

Search for other papers by Amos Lal in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Jhansi Lakshmi Maradana Department of Internal Medicine, Saint Vincent Hospital at Worcester Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA

Search for other papers by Jhansi Lakshmi Maradana in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Pruthvi Raj Velamala Department of Internal Medicine, Saint Vincent Hospital at Worcester Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA

Search for other papers by Pruthvi Raj Velamala in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Trivedi Nitin Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Saint Vincent Hospital at Worcester Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA

Search for other papers by Trivedi Nitin in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Summary

Mifepristone is a promising option for the management of hypercortisolism associated with hyperglycemia. However, its use may result in serious electrolyte imbalances, especially during dose escalation. In our patient with adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent macro-nodular adrenal hyperplasia, unilateral adrenalectomy resulted in biochemical and clinical improvement, but subclinical hypercortisolism persisted following adrenalectomy. She was started on mifepristone. Unfortunately, she missed her follow-up appointments following dosage escalation and required hospitalization at an intensive care level for severe refractory hypokalemia.

Learning points:

Open access
Stephanie Wei Ping Wong Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Prescot, UK

Search for other papers by Stephanie Wei Ping Wong in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Yew Wen Yap Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Prescot, UK

Search for other papers by Yew Wen Yap in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Ram Prakash Narayanan Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Prescot, UK

Search for other papers by Ram Prakash Narayanan in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Mohammad Al-Jubouri Department of Biochemistry, St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Prescot, UK

Search for other papers by Mohammad Al-Jubouri in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Ashley Grossman Centre for Endocrinology, William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK

Search for other papers by Ashley Grossman in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Christina Daousi Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Aintree University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK

Search for other papers by Christina Daousi in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Yahya Mahgoub Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Prescot, UK

Search for other papers by Yahya Mahgoub in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Summary

We report our experience on managing a case of florid Cushing’s disease with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) sepsis using intravenous etomidate in the intensive care unit of a UK district general hospital.

Learning points:

  • Severe Cushing’s syndrome is associated with high morbidity and mortality.

  • Etomidate is a safe and effective medical therapy to rapidly lower cortisol levels even in the context of severe sepsis and immunosuppression.

  • Etomidate should ideally be administered in an intensive care unit but is still feasible in a district general hospital.

  • During treatment with etomidate, accumulation of serum 11β-deoxycortisol (11DOC) levels can cross-react with laboratory cortisol measurement leading to falsely elevated serum cortisol levels. For this reason, serum cortisol measurement using a mass spectrometry assay should ideally be used to guide etomidate prescription.

Open access
Taisuke Uchida Department of Neurology, Respirology, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

Search for other papers by Taisuke Uchida in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Hideki Yamaguchi Department of Neurology, Respirology, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

Search for other papers by Hideki Yamaguchi in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Kazuhiro Nagamine Department of Neurology, Respirology, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

Search for other papers by Kazuhiro Nagamine in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Tadato Yonekawa Department of Neurology, Respirology, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

Search for other papers by Tadato Yonekawa in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Eriko Nakamura Department of Diagnostic Pathology, University of Miyazaki Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

Search for other papers by Eriko Nakamura in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Nobuhiro Shibata Department of Clinical Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

Search for other papers by Nobuhiro Shibata in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Fumiaki Kawano Division of the Gastrointestinal, Endocrine and Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

Search for other papers by Fumiaki Kawano in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Yujiro Asada Department of Diagnostic Pathology, University of Miyazaki Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

Search for other papers by Yujiro Asada in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Masamitsu Nakazato Department of Neurology, Respirology, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan

Search for other papers by Masamitsu Nakazato in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Summary

We report a case of rapid pleural effusion after discontinuation of lenvatinib. A 73-year-old woman was diagnosed with poorly differentiated thyroid cancer with right pleural metastasis. Weekly paclitaxel treatment was performed for 18 weeks, but it was not effective. Oral administration of lenvatinib, a multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitor, reduced the size of cervical and thoracic tumors and lowered serum thyroglobulin levels. Lenvatinib was discontinued on day 28 because of Grade 2 thrombocytopenia and Grade 3 petechiae. Seven days after discontinuation of lenvatinib, the patient was hospitalized because of dyspnea and right pleural effusion. Pleural effusion rapidly improved with drainage and re-initiation of lenvatinib and did not recur. Anorexia caused by lenvatinib led to undernutrition, which resulted in death 13 months after initiation of lenvatinib. Autopsy revealed extensive necrosis with primary and metastatic lesions, suggesting that the patient responded to lenvatinib. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of flare-up in patients with thyroid cancer treated with lenvatinib.

Learning points:

  • Autopsy findings revealed that lenvatinib was efficacious in treating poorly differentiated thyroid cancer without primary lesion resection.

  • Flare-up phenomenon may occur in thyroid cancer treated with lenvatinib.

  • Attention should be paid to flare-up phenomenon within a few days of discontinuing lenvatinib.

Open access
Carolina Shalini Singarayar Endocrine Unit, Department of Medicine, Selayang Hospital, Selangor, Malaysia

Search for other papers by Carolina Shalini Singarayar in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Foo Siew Hui Endocrine Unit, Department of Medicine, Selayang Hospital, Selangor, Malaysia

Search for other papers by Foo Siew Hui in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Nicholas Cheong Endocrine Unit, Department of Medicine, Selayang Hospital, Selangor, Malaysia

Search for other papers by Nicholas Cheong in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Goay Swee En Endocrine Unit, Department of Medicine, Selayang Hospital, Selangor, Malaysia

Search for other papers by Goay Swee En in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Summary

Thyrotoxicosis is associated with cardiac dysfunction; more commonly, left ventricular dysfunction. However, in recent years, there have been more cases reported on right ventricular dysfunction, often associated with pulmonary hypertension in patients with thyrotoxicosis. Three cases of thyrotoxicosis associated with right ventricular dysfunction were presented. A total of 25 other cases of thyrotoxicosis associated with right ventricular dysfunction published from 1994 to 2017 were reviewed along with the present 3 cases. The mean age was 45 years. Most (82%) of the cases were newly diagnosed thyrotoxicosis. There was a preponderance of female gender (71%) and Graves’ disease (86%) as the underlying aetiology. Common presenting features included dyspnoea, fatigue and ankle oedema. Atrial fibrillation was reported in 50% of the cases. The echocardiography for almost all cases revealed dilated right atrial and or ventricular chambers with elevated pulmonary artery pressure. The abnormal echocardiographic parameters were resolved in most cases after rendering the patients euthyroid. Right ventricular dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension are not well-recognized complications of thyrotoxicosis. They are life-threatening conditions that can be reversed with early recognition and treatment of thyrotoxicosis. Signs and symptoms of right ventricular dysfunction should be sought in all patients with newly diagnosed thyrotoxicosis, and prompt restoration of euthyroidism is warranted in affected patients before the development of overt right heart failure.

Learning points:

  • Thyrotoxicosis is associated with right ventricular dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension apart from left ventricular dysfunction described in typical thyrotoxic cardiomyopathy.

  • Symptoms and signs of right ventricular dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension should be sought in all patients with newly diagnosed thyrotoxicosis.

  • Thyrotoxicosis should be considered in all cases of right ventricular dysfunction or pulmonary hypertension not readily explained by other causes.

  • Prompt restoration of euthyroidism is warranted in patients with thyrotoxicosis complicated by right ventricular dysfunction with or without pulmonary hypertension to allow timely resolution of the abnormal cardiac parameters before development of overt right heart failure.

Open access
Catarina Roque Endocrinology Diabetes and Metabolism Clinic

Search for other papers by Catarina Roque in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Ricardo Fonseca Endocrinology Diabetes and Metabolism Clinic

Search for other papers by Ricardo Fonseca in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Carlos Tavares Bello Endocrinology Diabetes and Metabolism Clinic

Search for other papers by Carlos Tavares Bello in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Carlos Vasconcelos Endocrinology Diabetes and Metabolism Clinic

Search for other papers by Carlos Vasconcelos in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
António Galzerano Anatomopathology Department, Hospital de Egas Moniz C.H.L.O.-E.P.E, Lisbon, Portugal

Search for other papers by António Galzerano in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Sância Ramos Anatomopathology Department, Hospital de Egas Moniz C.H.L.O.-E.P.E, Lisbon, Portugal

Search for other papers by Sância Ramos in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Summary

Primary adrenal lymphoma is a rare malignancy. It frequently presents bilaterally and with symptoms of adrenal insufficiency. Amiodarone may induce secondary organ dysfunction, and thyrotoxicosis develops in 15% of cases. The symptomatology of both conditions is nonspecific, especially in the elderly, and a high suspicion index is necessary for appropriate diagnosis. A 78-year-old female presented to the emergency department with confusion, nausea and vomiting. She had recently been to the emergency department with urinary tract infection, vomiting and acute hypochloremic hyponatremia. Upon re-evaluation, the leukocyturia persisted and because of TSH 0.01 µU/mL and free-T4 68 (10–18) pmol/L, she was admitted to the Endocrinology ward. Further evaluation supported amiodarone-induced thyroiditis type 2. Sepsis ensued, in the setting of nosocomial pneumonia. Hemodynamic instability, hyponatremia, hypoglycemia and vomiting raised the suspicion of adrenocortical insufficiency. Fluid resuscitation and hydrocortisone led to clinical improvement, and adrenal insufficiency was admitted. The thoracoabdominal tomography suggested an endobronchic primary lesion with hepatic and adrenal secondary deposits (6.6 and 7 cm), but this was confirmed neither on pleural effusion nor on bronchofibroscopic fluid analyses. The adrenals were not accessible for biopsy. Despite high-dose hydrocortisone maintenance, the patient died before definite diagnosis. The autopsy confirmed primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Learning points:

  • Primary adrenal lymphoma is a rare cause of adrenal insufficiency, but progression can be fast and fatal.

  • Hyperpigmentation is frequently absent.

  • The presenting symptoms are nonspecific and might mimic infection. Disproportion of the general state with signs of specific organ symptomatology is a diagnostic clue.

  • Infection may precipitate adrenal crisis and worsen thyroid function with further adrenal insufficiency exacerbation.

  • In the context of thyrotoxicosis, there may be little clinical response to a therapeutic trial with standard dose glucocorticoids.

  • High-dose glucocorticoid substitution may be required to achieve clinical stability in thyrotoxic patients.

Open access
Han Soo Park Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism

Search for other papers by Han Soo Park in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Su Kyoung Kwon Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism

Search for other papers by Su Kyoung Kwon in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Ye Na Kim Division of Nephrology, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan, Republic of Korea

Search for other papers by Ye Na Kim in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Summary

Thyroid storm is a rare and potentially life-threatening medical emergency. We experienced a case of thyroid storm associated with sepsis caused by pneumonia, which had a catastrophic course including recurrent cardiac arrest and subsequent multiple organ failure (MOF). A 22-year-old female patient with a 10-year history of Graves’ disease was transferred to our emergency department (ED). She had a cardiac arrest at her home and a second cardiac arrest at the ED. Her heart recovered after 20 min of cardiac resuscitation. She was diagnosed with thyroid storm associated with hyperthyroidism complicated by pneumonia and sepsis. Although full conventional medical treatment was given, she had progressive MOF and hemodynamic instability consisting of hyperthermia, tachycardia and hypotension. Because of hepatic and renal failure with refractory hypotension, we reduced the patient’s dose of beta-blocker and antithyroid drug, and she was started on continuous veno-venous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) with intravenous albumin and plasma supplementation. Subsequently, her body temperature and pulse rate began to stabilize within 1 h, and her blood pressure reached 120/60 mmHg after 6 h. We discontinued antithyroid drug 3 days after admission because of aggravated hyperbilirubinemia. The patient exhibited progressive improvement in thyroid function even after cessation of antithyroid drug, and she successfully recovered from thyroid storm and MOF. This is the first case of thyroid storm successfully treated by CRRT in a patient considered unfit for antithyroid drug treatment.

Learning points:

  • The presenting manifestations of thyroid storm vary and can include cardiac arrest with multiorgan failure in rare cases.

  • In some patients with thyroid storm, especially those with severe complications, conventional medical treatment may be ineffective or inappropriate.

  • During thyroid storm, the initiation of CRRT can immediately lower body temperature and subsequently stabilize vital signs.

  • Early initiation of CRRT can be life-saving in patients with thyroid storm complicated by MOF, even when used in combination with suboptimal medical treatment.

Open access
Elise Flynn Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia

Search for other papers by Elise Flynn in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Sara Baqar Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia

Search for other papers by Sara Baqar in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Dorothy Liu University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia

Search for other papers by Dorothy Liu in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Elif I Ekinci Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia

Search for other papers by Elif I Ekinci in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Stephen Farrell Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia

Search for other papers by Stephen Farrell in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Jeffrey D Zajac Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia

Search for other papers by Jeffrey D Zajac in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Mario De Luise Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia

Search for other papers by Mario De Luise in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Ego Seeman Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia

Search for other papers by Ego Seeman in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Summary

ACTH-secreting phaeochromocytoma (ASP) is a rare cause of ACTH-dependent Cushing’s syndrome (CS). We report the case of a 63-year-old female presenting with CS secondary to an ASP complicated by bowel perforation. This case report highlights ASP as an uncommon but important cause of ectopic ACTH secretion (EAS). There have been 29 cases of ASP, all of which were unilateral and benign, but associated with significant complications. Patients presenting with ASP have the potential for cure with unilateral adrenalectomy. Given this promising prognosis if recognised, ASP should be considered in the diagnostic workup of ACTH-dependent CS. As this case demonstrates, gastrointestinal complications can arise from severe hypercortisolaemia associated with CS. Early medical and surgical intervention is imperative as mortality approaches 50% once bowel perforation occurs.

Learning points

  • Consider phaeochromocytoma in the diagnostic workup of ACTH-dependent CS; screen with plasma metanephrines or urinary catecholamines.

  • Serial screening may be required if ACTH-secreting phaeochromocytoma is suspected, as absolute levels can be misleading.

  • Early catecholamine receptor blockade and adrenal synthesis blockade may avoid the need for rescue bilateral adrenalectomy in ACTH-secreting phaeochromocytoma.

  • Consider early medical or surgical management when gastrointestinal features are present in patients with CS, as bowel perforation due to severe hypercortisolaemia can occur and is associated with significant mortality.

Open access