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Open access

Jay Nguyen and Dennis Joseph

Summary

Increased intracranial pressure (ICP) can present with symptoms of headache, vomiting, visual changes, and tinnitus. Papilledema may be seen on physical exam. Thyroid disease has been a rare secondary cause of increased ICP. We present a 16-year-old female who had a worsening headache for 6 months. She was found to have signs, symptoms, physical exam findings, and diagnostic studies consistent with both increased ICP and previously undiagnosed Graves’ disease. The patient was treated with a 19-month course of methimazole 40 mg daily. Her headache and papilledema resolved shortly after medication initiation. The timeline of symptoms and resolution of her increased ICP symptoms with treatment of Graves’ disease suggests that hyperthyroidism was the underlying cause of her increased ICP. Clinicians should consider Graves’ disease as the etiology in pediatric patients presenting with signs and symptoms of increased ICP with papilledema.

Learning points

  • Symptoms of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) include headache, vomiting, transient visual changes, and tinnitus.

  • Secondary causes of increased ICP should be considered in males, young children, older patients, and those not overweight.

  • Clinicians should consider Graves’ disease as the etiology in pediatric patients presenting with signs and symptoms of increased ICP with papilledema. They should assess for orbitopathy and thyromegaly and inquire about symptoms that would be indicative of hyperthyroidism.

Open access

Jay Nguyen and Dennis Joseph

Summary

Autonomous thyroid adenomas are caused by activating mutations in the genes encoding the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) or mutations in the Gas subunit of the TSHR. Nodules with suspicious sonographic features should be submitted to fine-needle aspiration. Additional molecular testing may be performed to characterize the thyroid nodule’s malignant potential further. We present a patient who underwent whole-transcriptome RNA-sequencing that indicated a TSHR I568T mutation after an ultrasound showed suspicious sonographic features and fine-needle aspiration was ‘suspicious for malignancy’. The patient underwent thyroid resection and was found to have a locally invasive classical papillary thyroid carcinoma. Most reports of TSHR I568T mutation have been seen in patients with benign thyroid conditions. While there is insufficient data to suggest that the TSHR I568T mutation causes aggressive thyroid malignancy, we believe clinicians who identify the presence of this mutation on genome sequencing should be cautious about the possibility of locally invasive thyroid malignancy, especially when associated with Bethesda V cytopathology.

Learning points

  • Germline and somatic activating mutations in the genes coding for the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) have been frequently reported in familial and sporadic autonomous thyroid adenomas and non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism.

  • Most reports of TSHR I568T mutation have been detected in patients with benign thyroid conditions.

  • We present a patient who underwent whole-transcriptome RNA-sequencing that indicated a TSHR I568T mutation and subsequently underwent thyroid resection and was found to have a locally invasive classical papillary thyroid carcinoma.

  • Clinicians who identify the presence of TSHR I568T mutation on genome sequencing should be cautious about the possibility of locally invasive thyroid malignancy, especially when associated with Bethesda V cytopathology.